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recently I tried to tackle C++ inheritance and polymorphism, but I have a few problems that make no sense to me. I have 2 headers in separate files and a cpp file with an implementation. A short summary of my code is as follows:

#ifndef MANDEL_H_
#define MANDEL_H_

class Mandel{

public:
    virtual void compute("various arguments") = 0;

    //dummy destructor, I must have one or compile is sad and I dunno why
    virtual ~Mandel();
private:
    virtual int compute_point("various arguments") = 0;
};

#endif

This is my "grandfather" header called "Mandel.h". Now Moving to the "father" header. This next header specifies a few variables that are specific to a white and black implementation of Mandel and is called "Black_White_Mandel.h":

#ifndef BLACK_WHITE_MANDEL_H_
#define BLACK_WHITE_MANDEL_H_

#include "Mandel.h"

class Black_White_Mandel: public Mandel {

protected:
    int max_iterations; //a specific variable of this Black_White Version
};

#endif

And now follows an implementation of the Black_White_Mandel header, in a separate file called White_Black_Mandel_Imp1.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "Mandel.h"
#include "Black_White_Mandel.h"

using namespace std;

//constructor
Black_White_Mandel::Black_White_Mandel(){
    max_iterations = 255;
}

//destructor
Black_White_Mandel::~Black_White_Mandel(){}

int Black_White_Mandel::compute_point("various arguments") {
    //code and stuff
    return 0;
}

void Black_White_Mandel::compute("various arguments") {
     //code and stuff
}

So, Mandel.h has 2 functions are must be implemented because they are virtual and "=0". In White_Black_Mandel_Imp1.cpp when I implement those functions that compiler goes nuts. It says the functions are not defined in the White_Black_Mandel.h and although that is true, they are defined in Mandel.h. So, by inheritance, White_Black_Mandel_Imp1.cpp should know that it HAS THE OBLIGATION of implementing these functions from Mandel.h.

I don't understand, one of my friends says that my White_Black_Mandel.h file should be an exact copy of Mandel.h but with a few additional things, but this really looks stupid to me, it makes no sense.

What am I doing wrong?

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2  
You actually have to declare the Mandel member functions that you intend to implement in Black_White_Mandel too. –  juanchopanza Mar 15 '13 at 0:24
1  
just as an aside, a virtual function with "=0" is referred to as a "pure virtual" function –  alrikai Mar 15 '13 at 0:25
2  
What does "the compiler goes nuts" mean? Please post the exact error messages. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 15 '13 at 0:32
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Although you have 2 pure virtual methods in your ancestor class this doesn't imply that their prototypes are ready to be used in children classes.

You must declare the prototypes even in your child class:

class Black_White_Mandel: public Mandel {

public:
    virtual void compute("various arguments")

protected:
    int max_iterations; //a specific variable of this Black_White Version

private:
    virtual int compute_point("various arguments");
};

The virtual keyword is optional but it is useful to know that the method was indeed virtual. You are not forced to implement them in this specific subclass, you could avoid specifying anything but you'd have still two pure virtual methods that must be implemented so you won't be able to instantiate any object of this child class (you will have to implement them anyway down in the hierarchy tree).

The virtual destructor is required because otherwise in a similar situation:

Base *derived = new Derived();
delete derived;

the compiler couldn't be able to invoke the correct destructor.

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So in this case my child header has to be a copy of the father header with a few additions. I gotta say, this still sounds stupid to me .. I wouldn't have this problem in Java xDThanks for the answer! –  Flame_Phoenix Mar 15 '13 at 0:36
    
@Flame_Phoenix You can implement the method in the header and it looks very similar to Java. Putting it in a separate cpp file means it doesn't have to be parsed for every usage of the class. That's why the duplication is introduced: the need to avoid recompilation (and occasional cyclic dependencies). –  Peter Wood Mar 15 '13 at 0:49
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Add the prototypes for compute and compute_point to Black_White_Mandel.

There are cases where you inherit from a base class that has purely virtual functions and don't implement all of them: your derived class will remain abstract and will need to be inherited from by another class etc. until all purely virtual functions are implemented.

E.g.

class A {
    virtual void foo() = 0;
    virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class B : public A {
    virtual void foo() {};
};

class C : public B {
    virtual void bar() {};
};

class D : public A {
    virtual void foo() {};
    virtual void bar() {};
};

The only instantiable classes above are C and D.

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So, what you are saying is that my White_Black_Mandel.h file has to be an exact copy of Mandel.h file? What if I remove the "=0" restriction? –  Flame_Phoenix Mar 15 '13 at 0:30
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "exact copy". If you remove the "= 0" from Mandel.h you will need to provide a base implementation of those functions (probably not what you want.) –  Jacob Parker Mar 15 '13 at 0:32
    
By exact copy I mean that every method and variable present in "Mandel.h" must be in the "Black_White_Mandel.h" header as well, or else the code wont compile. Is this assumption correct, provided the cpp file will implement everything from both headers? –  Flame_Phoenix Mar 15 '13 at 0:34
1  
It'd probably be best if you consulted a book/tutorial on inheritance and virtual functions in C++. I hesitate to try and fully explain this in 600 characters :) –  Jacob Parker Mar 15 '13 at 0:42
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White_Black_Mandel_Imp1.cpp should know that it HAS THE OBLIGATION

It does not and should not. It can decide to be an abstract class too, in which case it can leave these functions alone.

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This really doesn't answer much -.- –  Flame_Phoenix Mar 15 '13 at 0:37
1  
@Flame_Phoenix It answers a lot. Nothing is implicit. –  Peter Wood Mar 15 '13 at 0:52
    
@Flame_Phoenix: it doesn't explicitly answers what you've asked but it is correct: the subclass doesn't have the obligation of implementing the methods. It has the obligation to implement them only if it concretely istantiated somewhere. –  Jack Mar 15 '13 at 0:59
1  
I'm not sure how could I put it in another form, but let's try. You seem to assume, for some reason, that notation like func()=0 in some class X obligates immediate children of X to provide a definition of func(). This assumption is in fact erroneous, there is no such obligation. Does this explain the situation better? –  n.m. Mar 15 '13 at 1:03
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The reason you must provide a declaration in the implementing class is that it is legal for a derived class to override a virtual function using a different return type, as long as the new return type is covariant with the original return type. For example, your base class could return BaseReturnedObject&, but your derived class has an option of returning DerivedReturnObject&. Without a declaration in the derived class the compiler does not know what is the return type of your method. It cannot assume that it is the same as in the base, so the compiler requires a prototype.

See this question for rules of overriding with covariant return types.

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Imagine you have 4 methods in your "grandfather" class, all of which are pure virtual. Now you intend to implement two in your "father" class and two in the "child" class. BTW, this particular terminology is not ideal, but I'm sticking to it because you started with it.

When you define the class (in the .h file between class whatever { and }; you tell the compiler which of the functions from the base class (grandfather class in your terminology) you intend to override. You can put the implementation right there in the header, or you can have it in a .cpp file. But you must specify which of the 4 functions (if any) you are going to override.

If you don't mention a particular inherited function in the class definition (in the header file as you are saying) then when it comes time to compile the implementation (the .cpp file) the compiler is saying "WHAT? You never told me you plan to override this function!" Your response seems to be "dude, it's pure virtual, if I don't override it I can't instantiate the object!" but you know what? The compiler couldn't care less about that. It doesn't know if you're trying to make an instantiable object or not, if you intend to inherit further, or even really that the function was pure virtual in the base class. All it knows is, it's compiling an implementation file, and it comes across a function you didn't tell it about in the class definition.

So, when you write a class something { ... }; class definition, be sure to list all the functions you intend to implement for that class, whether you inherited them or not. Do not list functions you inherit unchanged and won't be implementing. If what you're inheriting from is an interface (all the functions are pure virtual) then yeah, you'll have to list them all in the class if you're going to implement them all. That's because the language didn't set aside a special case for that circumstance. This is not at all equivalent to "my header has to be an exact copy of the header file for the grandfather class" and I think you would see that more clearly if you had more functions in the grandfather class, and didn't implement them all in the child class.

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