Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am implementing a design which contains elements which are semantically headers (h3, h4, etc.), are full-width block elements, and are followed by a vertically centered horizontal line which extends the full width of the header a la:

headers

I know I could take care of this by wrapping each header in a <div> and inserting another block-level element after it but would prefer not to pollute my HTML like that. My first inclination was to use a ::after element on the headers, like so:

.line-header::after {
    content:'\00a0';
    display: inline-block;
    float: right;
    width: 55%;
    margin-top: -12px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid gray;
}

However, this requires making the ::after element fixed-width, which obviously doesn't work with different-width headers: http://jsfiddle.net/nbSTf/

Any ideas on how to get a variable-width line which will fill the space to the right of the header, without inserting extra elements into the HTML?

EDIT: Tyriar's answer below (suggesting drawing the line full-width behind the header and setting the background-color to erase the line behind the text) reminded me that this is taking place in front of a repeating background image - so no background tricks are possible unfortunately.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this for your CSS:

EDIT:

body { background: red; overflow-x: hidden }

.line-header {
    margin-top: 15px;
    margin-right: 5px;
    display: inline;
    z-index: 100;
    float: left;
    clear: left;
}

.line-header::after {
    position:absolute;
    content:'\00a0';
    width: 100%;
    margin-top: -12px;
    margin-left: 5px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid gray;
    z-index: 0;
}

I only tested this in Chrome. Here's the Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
I was impressed with your method and didn't really know what was going on. I had play with it and apparently it can break pretty easily without a wrapper around .line-header jsfiddle.net/Tyriar/uJ5ww still, nice solution :) –  Daniel Imms Mar 15 '13 at 9:32
    
This is an interesting solution - however, even in Tyriar's fiddle where the wrapper div constrains the "width: 100%" to a reasonable amount, if you scroll to the right of the Result pane, the horizontal lines are still the same width, with the one for the longer header pushed farther to the right - the same problem I had but in reverse. :) I need them to line up at the RH edge of the containing element. Am I missing something? –  Eric P Mar 15 '13 at 20:41
    
@Eric P my fiddle showed a counter example, not a fix. Also overflow-x will probably not be sufficient. That will only work if the content wasn't centered in the page and padding on the right wasn't desired. –  Daniel Imms Mar 16 '13 at 0:56
    
I don't get what you're saying. You would just need overflow-x:hidden on whatever contains the headers. As long as overflow-x:hidden is acceptable for that container, then I don't see why that's not a valid solution. Here's another fiddle where the headers are wrapped by a div container with a set width which is centered in the browser. –  Jacob VanScoy Mar 16 '13 at 3:18
    
@JacobVanScoy that works, change your answer to use #container instead of body. –  Daniel Imms Mar 16 '13 at 3:32

Here's a method you could do it with, unfortunately it relies on an attribute (not necessarily title), this could easily be set programmatically with JavaScript though.

It uses :before and :after pseudo elements, :after is used to draw the line the full width and :before is used to draw white background behind the text of the size of the text. The pseudo-elements need their z-index set correctly to layer in the correct order.

jsFiddle

Screenshot of example

HTML

<h3 class="line-header" title="Longer Header Looks Good">Longer Header Looks Good</h3>
<h3 class="line-header" title="Short Doesn't">Short Doesn't</h3>

CSS

.line-header {
    margin-top: 15px;
    position:relative;
}
.line-header:before {
    position: absolute;
    display:block;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    bottom:0;
    content: attr(title);
    background-color:#FFF;
    color:#FFF;
    z-index:-1;
    padding-right:.5em;
}
.line-header::after {
    position:absolute;
    content:'';
    display: block;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    top:50%;
    background-color:#555;
    height:1px;
    z-index:-2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Tyriar - I was initially looking at something much like this, but unfortunately the background behind the headers is a repeating image which nixes background tricks. I will edit the question to clarify this. –  Eric P Mar 15 '13 at 20:27
    
Yea, it's a lot tougher if you have a tiled background lol. –  Daniel Imms Mar 16 '13 at 0:57

Well, how about doing it in reverse? Draw the lines (in any way you like) then use :after to insert the headers, no additional HTML, but some extra CSS.

HTML

<div id="header1"></div>
<div id="header2"></div>

To Draw the Line, simply border-top-style:solid;. To Write the headers, :after.

CSS

div
{
    position:relative;
    border-top-style:solid;
    margin-top:20px; /* just for spacing */
}
div:after
{
    display:block;
    background-color: #FFFFFF;
    position:absolute;
    top:-10px;
    left:0px;
}
#header1:after
{
    content:"Hello;"
}
#header2:after
{
    content:"Hello Again";
}

You'll get something like this.

For more customization, you can enlarge the font, change the colors, add padding (for more white space), just change top the way it suits you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.