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I'm trying to implement periodic memoization for functions with no arguments.

let mutable superVersion = 1

type Memoize() =
    member this.m f =
        let cache = ref 0
        let version = ref 0
        let returnValue() =
            if !version = superVersion then
                !cache
            else
                System.Console.WriteLine(!cache)
                cache := f()
                System.Console.WriteLine(!cache)
                version := superVersion
                !cache
        returnValue()

let simpleFunction() = 10 + 5 // Could be some mutable data here
let aFunction() =
    let Mem = new Memoize()
    let myFunc() = simpleFunction() + 1
    Mem.m myFunc

The idea is simple. When data comes into this program the superVersion increments by 1. This way all functions will have to recalculate but only when new data has come in. After that many later functions can build on the earlier functions, and never make the earlier functions recalculate. This way no events are necessary.

Now I'm terribly new to programming and especially F#. So I don't know, will building lots of these functions on top of each other cause a stack overflow or something?

All I'm trying to do is data research without having to worry too much about calculating things in correct order using events or something. So kind of like excel except excel goes even further and calculates only when the previous cell in the link (the dependencies) has changed.

So I'm hoping to get some information on this problem. However, now onto the main question:

When I then call aFunction(), both the version and cache get calculated then reset back to 0. You can see I've placed 2 console writelines. In the first one the value is 0, and the second one is 16. Calling aFunction again (without changing superVersion), I get the exact same results instead of getting 16 in both. Why does cache reset back to 0?

Thanks so much.

Edit: Like the answer I chose let me know, I really forgot what functions do. They call their bodies when used. So everything is reset in them. I was way too focused on them where I should have implemented a class.

The correct implementation for what I'm wanting to do would go something like this:

type Cell(f) =
    let mem = Memoize()
    let _Value() = mem.m f
    member this.Value = _Value()

Now for each function, or as I'm calling it now, cell. I simply create a new instance of cell and pass in the calculation I want for it (a function). Now because I'm in a class, Memoize() is created only once and its state is saved. Using the new implementation of Memoize seen in John Palmer's answer. However I changed references that I had originally chosen to mutables. I think that's more efficient.

share|improve this question
    
Aww man I'm so embarrassed. There is something terribly stupid in that code somewhere. I just know it, and probably the idea too :P –  Dimension Mar 15 '13 at 2:09
    
The updated version you are using now is an almost exact clone of Lazy<'t> - see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd233247.aspx –  John Palmer Mar 15 '13 at 20:41
    
Well the point of this was to be able to change versions and have it recalculate because of new data coming in and thus invalidating everything. I don't see how that is possible with lazy. It says in the link you included: " Force causes the execution to be performed only one time. Subsequent calls to Force return the same result, but do not execute any code." - But thanks for the info though, it's interesting and I didn't know! –  Dimension Mar 16 '13 at 0:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Every time you call the function, the variables are reset - you need to move them outside the function to something like

type Memoize() =
    let cache = ref 0
    let version = ref 0
    member this.m f =

        let returnValue() =
            if !version = superVersion then
                !cache
            else
                System.Console.WriteLine(!cache)
                cache := f()
                System.Console.WriteLine(!cache)
                version := superVersion
                !cache
        returnValue()
share|improve this answer
    
Wow thank you. I would have never made that mistake in c# :P. I guess the transition is confusing me. One more question, is it fine calling functions like this that create a tree of other functions to travel down and calculate first. Won't that create a stackoverflow? I didn't exactly give an example of that, but I just mean more functions implementing this Memoization thing calculating from others implementing it. –  Dimension Mar 15 '13 at 2:28
    
Creating a layer of functions should be fine as long as you are sensible, you need many layers before you start hitting stack size limits. –  John Palmer Mar 15 '13 at 2:29
2  
@Dimension - Also, you appear to have reimplemented the Lazy<'t> type –  John Palmer Mar 15 '13 at 4:50
    
Whoops. It's not just the code you fixed that needs fixing. Of course I have the same problem with all the functions too. All of them will reset on use and call the constructor of Memoize() again. I don't know what went through my head that made me think all the let bindings would only be called once in each function. –  Dimension Mar 15 '13 at 9:21
    
The idea is not completely dead though. All I have to do instead is to create yet another class and use it as the functions I want. To create a new function all I do is create a new instance of the class, passing in the function, and the class takes care of the rest. –  Dimension Mar 15 '13 at 9:55

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