Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I define a CHECK CONSTRAINT on a table, I find the condition clause stored can be different than what I entered.
Example:

Alter table T1 add constraint C1 CHECK (field1 in (1,2,3))

Looking at what is stored:

select cc.Definition from sys.check_constraints cc
inner join sys.objects o on o.object_id = cc.parent_object_id
where cc.type = 'C' and cc.name = 'T1';

I see:

([field1]=(3) OR [field1]=(2) OR [field1]=(1))

Whilst these are equivalent, they are not the same text. (A similar behaviour occurs when using a BETWEEN clause).

My reason for wishing this did not happen is that I am trying to programatically ensure that all my CHECK constraints are correct by comparing the text I would use to define the constraint with that stored in sys.check_constraints - and if different then drop and recreate the constraint.

However, in these cases, they are always different and so the program would always think it needs to recreate the constraint.

Question is:

  1. Is there any known reason why SQL Server does this translation? Is it just removing a bit of syntactic sugar and storing the clause in a simpler form?
  2. Is there a way to avoid the behaviour (other than to write my constraint clauses in the long form to match what SQL Server would change it to)?
  3. Is there another way to tell if my check constraint is 'out of date' and needs recreating?
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there any known reason why SQL Server does this translation? Is it just removing a bit of syntactic sugar and storing the clause in a simpler form?

I'm not aware of any reasons documented in the Books Online, or elsewhere. However, my guess is that it's normalized for some purposes that are internal to SQL Server. It might allow SQL Server to be a bit lenient in defining the expression (such as using Database for a column name), but guaranteeing that the column names are always appropriately escaped for whatever engine needs to parse the expression (ie, [Database]).

Is there a way to avoid the behaviour (other than to write my constraint clauses in the long form to match what SQL Server would change it to)?

Probably not. But if your constraints aren't terribly complicated, is re-writing the constraint clauses in the long form such a bad idea?

Is there another way to tell if my check constraint is 'out of date' and needs recreating?

Before I answer this directly, I'd point out that there's a bit of programming philosophy involved here. The API that SQL Server provides for the text of a CHECK constraint only guarantees that you'll get something equivalent to the original expression. While you could certainly build some fancy methods to try to ensure that you'll always be able to reproduce SQL Server's normalized version of the expression, there's no guarantee that Microsoft won't change its normalization rules in the future. And indeed, there's probably no guarantee that two equivalent expressions will always be normalized identically!

So, I'd first advise you to re-examine your architecture, and see if you can accomplish the same result without having to rely on undocumented API behavior.

Having said that, there are a number of methods outlined in this question (and answer).

Another alternative, which is a bit more brute-force but perhaps acceptable, would be to always assume that the expression is "out of date" and simply drop/re-create the constraint every time you check. Unless you're expecting these constraints to frequently become out-of-date (or the tables are quite large), it seems this would be a decent solution. You could probably even run it in a transaction, so that if the new constraint is already violated, simply roll-back the transaction and report the error.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.