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How can I use Python to generate a bunch of spheres and ellipses in one plot? Ideally it would just entail setting the endpoints (or radii/axes) of each object and a color, like how you can easily generate rectangles/circles using endpoints.

I was imagining using something like matplotlib's 3-D module, where you can rotate & play with the plot once it's outputted. I'm open to using other libraries though!

I could possibly plot the equations as surfaces by manipulating & graphing a bunch of ellipsoid equations, but is there an easier solution?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

VPython might be the quickest path to getting some spheres and ellipsoids on the screen. Also, VPython is much more interactive than matplotlib (in the sense that you can rotate, zoom, etc), and it's very easy to get started. In the end, it depends on what you're looking for. There are lots of ways to get spheres and ellipsoids on the screen.

from visual import *
myell = ellipsoid(pos=(x0,y0,z0), length=L, height=H, width=W) 

enter image description here

ball = sphere(pos=(1,2,1), radius=0.5)

enter image description here

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seems like it only works with Python 2, though... –  MattDMo Mar 15 '13 at 3:29
    
VPython 5 works fine on Python 3. –  tom10 Mar 15 '13 at 4:15
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Were you looking for functionality that isn't included in matplotlib's mpl_toolkits.mplot3d module? From the 3D Surface demo:

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')

u = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100)
v = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)

x = 10 * np.outer(np.cos(u), np.sin(v))
y = 10 * np.outer(np.sin(u), np.sin(v))
z = 10 * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(u)), np.cos(v))
ax.plot_surface(x, y, z, rstride=4, cstride=4, color='b')

plt.show()

I don't see any reason why you couldn't define another shape in the same field:

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')

u = np.linspace(0, 2 * np.pi, 100)
v = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)

x = 10 * np.outer(np.cos(u), np.sin(v))
y = 10 * np.outer(np.sin(u), np.sin(v))
z = 10 * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(u)), np.cos(v))
x1 = 7 + 10 * np.outer(np.cos(u), np.sin(v))
y1 = 7 + 10 * np.outer(np.sin(u), np.sin(v))
z1 = 7 + 10 * np.outer(np.ones(np.size(u)), np.cos(v))

ax.plot_surface(x, y, z, rstride=4, cstride=4, color='b')
ax.plot_surface(x1, y1, z1, rstride=4, cstride=4, cmap=cm.coolwarm)

plt.show()
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Hm, I'm not quite sure what you're doing here (it looks vaguely like spherical coordinates), are you parametrizing a sphere and plotting it? And you would change around the coefficients to plot different shapes? –  jellyksong Mar 16 '13 at 3:51
1  
@jellyksong: I'll answer this since it doesn't seem that MattDMo is going to... This isn't really spherical coordinates, but, rather a set of circles in Cartesian coordinates. Note that for any particular value of z, you get a slice through the sphere, which is just a circle. These are those circles. It seems to be taken from here: matplotlib.org/examples/mplot3d/surface3d_demo2.html –  tom10 Mar 19 '13 at 15:27
1  
@tom10 - thanks for clarifying, sorry I was away for a bit. Yes, the example was taken was taken from the link I included. I'll make that more clear in the answer –  MattDMo Mar 19 '13 at 16:42
    
@jellyksong - I updated my answer above with a second sphere. –  MattDMo Mar 19 '13 at 17:04
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