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#include "cstack.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

bool isValidExpression (CStack&, char*);

int main (void)
{
   char expression[21];
   expression[0-21]=0;
   cout<< "Enter an expression: ";
   cin >>expression;
   CStack stack1;

   if (isValidExpression (stack1, expression)==true)
   {
      cout << "\nIt's a valid expression";
   }
   else
   {
      cout << "\nIt's NOT a valid expression";
   }
   return 0;
}

bool isValidExpression (CStack& stackA, char* strExp)
{


   for(int a=0;a<21 && strExp[a]!=0;a++)
   {
      cout<<"Action A" <<endl;
      stackA.push(strExp[a]);
   }
   /*if(strExp[a]=='}'||strExp[a]==']'||strExp[a]==')')
     {

     }
     else*/

   if(strExp[stackA.Top()]=='['||strExp[stackA.Top()]=='{'||strExp[stackA.Top()]=='(')
   {
      return false;
   }

   for(int a=stackA.Top();a>0;a--)
   {
      if(strExp[a]=='['||strExp[a]=='{'||strExp[a]=='(')
      {
         stackA.pop();
      }
      else if(strExp[a]==']')
      {
         for(int g=stackA.Top();g>0;g--)
         {
            if(strExp[a-1]=='[' && strExp[a-1]!=0)
            {
               stackA.pop();
               g--;
               break;
            }
            else if(strExp[a-1]==0)
            {
               return false;
            }
         }
      }
      else if(strExp[a]=='}')
      {
         for(int g=stackA.Top();g>0;g--)
         {
            if(strExp[a-1]=='{' && strExp[a-1]!=0)
            {
               stackA.pop();
               break;
            }
            else if(strExp[a-1]==0)
            {
               return false;
            }
         }
      }
      else if(strExp[a]==')')
      {
         for(int g=stackA.Top();g>0;g--)
         {
            if(strExp[a-1]=='(' && strExp[a-1]!=0)
            {
               stackA.pop();
               break;
            }
            else if(strExp[a-1]==0)
            {
               return false;
            }
         }
      }
   }
   return true;
}

What I am trying to do in this program is to input a statement composed of the following characters: ],},),[,{,(. A statement where all of the characters close in on each other like this ([]) would be true. (][) would not be true. [] would be true. [(]){{ would not be true.

This program is in C++, and I must use C-strings and not strings. I must use stack functions like push,pop,top. The code as it is now will consider [] correct and ][ incorrect, but beyond that It just considers all input correct. This code is what I have so far, any help would be appreciated.

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What isn't working? Which input doesn't give desired output? –  John3136 Mar 15 '13 at 3:57

3 Answers 3

expression[0-21]=0;

That statement literally means access the position -21 of the array and set it to 0. That is undefined behavior as the positions of an array of 21 elements range from 0 to 20 (note, 21 is as wrong as -21). The 0-21 is not a range but an arithmetic operation that yields a single value. If what you want is initialization of the array, that can be done in the definition:

char expression[21] = {};

or by other means, like a loop or memset (in this case where the type stored in the array is a POD)

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I think you are making the problem more complex than needed, hints on the implementation:

1. You shouldn't use `stack` as an input for the testing function, 
    that makes no sense, just use it locally.
2. You can scan over the whole expression and push some characters,
   if meet another characters, just check if the stack content meets the requirements,
   if not, invalid expression, say `1+(2*3)`, when `)` is met, we should just found
   a corresponding `(`.

I realized giving you the complete code to copy is not helpful, so think about it yourself more thoroughly, good luck! :)

share|improve this answer
    
laugh The OP is almost certainly doing homework, and you've just given the OP the complete answer, which won't teach the OP anything. :-) But yes, this is the way you 'should' do it. Except you aren't testing if the stack is non-empty in all the close cases. –  Omnifarious Mar 15 '13 at 4:20
    
Thanks guys, very helpful! –  user2167980 Mar 15 '13 at 4:24
    
@Omnifarious I didn't realize this and just reverted my code :) I also think giving the complete code here is not helpful, I prefer to give some hints, thanks for the reminder! –  Zhi Wang Mar 15 '13 at 4:25

This is a simple problem that you should be able to solve yourself. Here's an algorithm to guide you though (of course I won't write code for you because that would be totally wrong):

  1. Traverse input from midpoint to end, at each step pushing an element onto a stack.
  2. Traverse input from start to midpoint, at each step, popping an element off the stack to compare with the input element.
  3. If stack element is "]" and input element is "[" then continue. Check for each of the accepted delimiter types and if they match in the proper direction then continue. If they don't match properly then fail. Ignore elements that aren't of the accepted delimiter types.

You'll need to figure out a little bit here to deal with the midpoint (how to calculate it, and how to deal with even/odd number of elements, etc.). I recommend making up a good answer and a bad answer and testing the algorithm on paper first. Good luck!

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