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I have a SQL query looking something like this:

WITH RES_CTE AS
  (SELECT
  COLUMN1,
  COLUMN2,
  [MORE COLUMNS...]
  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY R.RANKING DESC) AS RowNum 
  FROM TABLE1 As R, TABLE2 As A, TABLE3 As U, TABLE4 As S, TABLE5 As T 
  WHERE R.RID = A.LID 
  AND S.QRYID = R.QRYID
  AND A.AID = U.AID
  AND CONDITION1 = 'VALUE'
  AND CONDITION2 = 'VALUE'
  AND [MORE CONDITIONS...]
),
Results_Cnt AS 
  (SELECT COUNT(*) CNT FROM Results_CTE)
SELECT * FROM Results_CTE, Results_Cnt WHERE RowNum >= 1 AND RowNum <= 25

Now, this query typically runs under 1 sec and returns the 25 records out of 5000 based on CONDITION1.

Recently though, I added a new column to a TABLE1 and then use its values as a CONDITION2 in the query above. The column is populated going forward but all the values in the past are NULL.

I read something above joining table that have NULL being a reason for slow execution. The table has about 1,300,000 records. 90% of them are NULL in the problematic column. But that column is not being joined on. (The one that is being joined on has an INDEX)

However, I wanted to try that anyway by creating a new column and simply copying the data like so:

ALTER TABLE TABLE1 ADD COL_NEW
UPDATE TABLE1 SET COL_NEW = COL_OLD

My next step was to replace the NULLs with an actual value but first, just for kicks, I changed the query to use as a condition the new field COL_NEW, and the problem went away.

Although I'm happy the problem is gone, I can't explain it to myself. Why was the execution slow in the first place if it had nothing to do with the NULLs?

UPDATE: It appears the problem may have resulted from a cached query plan. So the question essentially becomes, how to force a query plan refresh?

UPDATE: Although doing ALTER TABLE may have refreshed the execution plan, the problem returned. How can I find out what is happening?

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Can you please post the query execution plan? E.G. SET SHOWPLAN_ALL ON go --My SQL Query go SET SHOWPLAN_ALL OFF gO –  Shantanu Gupta Feb 26 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

It sounds like your query plan got cached while the stats for the new column showed it completely full of nulls, forcing a table scan. Following the ALTER TABLE the query plan was refreshed, replcing the table scan with an index lookujp again, and performance returned to normal.

The only way to know for sure if that is what happened would be to examine the query plans for both queries, but those are long gone now.

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You say long gone, I say backup :) But I don't understand what I should do differently next time when I want to add a column to a table and a whole lot of NULLs get in there? –  greener Mar 15 '13 at 5:45
    
A table scan is when the query starts at record 1 of the custered index, and scans all records to the end of the clusteed index. An index lookup is when the query steps into the index for the irst recod required, and steps trough the index only as far as neeeded to read all records required for the query. SQL Server usuall will perform a table san if it estimates that > 10% of the table's records must be read. Query plans are cached and not logged, so backup will not retrieve the old one. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 5:50
    
What I meant by backup was an AWS AMI in the poor-performing state. –  greener Mar 15 '13 at 5:52
    
You can force a query plan to be refreshed, though I forget the command just now. Rebuilding table stats will have the same effect, but may have to wait for a maintenance window. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 5:52
    
The problem returned. It's occurring intermittently. How can I find out what's happening? –  greener Mar 22 '13 at 18:21

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