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In a web application where should I mention and track the version number?

I'm using maven, which has version element in pom.xml. However, I cannot trace back that version number after packaging as war. Though, that version number is stored in the filename as applicationname-1.0.1.war. I wanted to know if it stores somewhere within the package or any way to do it?

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2 Answers 2

Use the maven archive plugin to store it in the WARs Manifest.

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If stamping the version in the MANIFEST is good enough for your needs then you'll want to configure the maven-war-plugin something like this:

  <build>
    <pluginManagement>
      <plugins>
        ...
        <plugin>
          <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
          <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
          <version>2.3</version>
          <configuration>
            <archive>
              <manifest>
                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
              </manifest>
              <manifestEntries>
                <Build-Repository-Rev>${SVN_REVISION}</Build-Repository-Rev>
                <Build-Time>${maven.build.timestamp}</Build-Time>
              </manifestEntries>
            </archive>
          </configuration>
        </plugin>
        ...

The children of the manifestEntries element can be anything and will create entries with given name. In this example, there would be entries of "Build-Repository-Rev" and "Build-Time" created using the "SVN_REVISION" environment variable and "maven.build.timestamp" property in addition to the entries created by the "addDefaultImplementationEntries" which would include an "Implementation-Version" entry set from ${project.version}.

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