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I try to write a char array to console as a name but it doesn't work. Here is the code

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int F()
{
    int S;
    printf("Type your student number(10 digit):"); 
    scanf("%d", &S ); 
    return S;
}

char * G()
{
    char N[20];
    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): "); 
    scanf("%s", N); 
    return N;
}

int main()
{
    int num=F();
    char * p ;
    p=G();

    printf("Hello %s, your student id is %d ", p,num);



    printf("\n The address of 1st char is %x ",&p[0]);
    printf("\n The address of 20th char is %x ",&p[19]);
    printf("\n The address of int is %x ",&num);
    return 0;
}

There is a problem after "Hello". Name(*p) is not written. I can't find any mistakes but the output is not what i want.

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closed as too localized by H2CO3, talonmies, Rob Mensching, Roman C, Patrick B. Mar 15 '13 at 8:06

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You make a static declaration as given. It will work

char * G()
{
    static char N[20];

    // char *N = (char *)malloc((sizeof(char)*20));

    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): ");
    scanf("%s", N);
    return N;
}

You can allocate memory using malloc also. Then you have to free the allocated memory after your use. Here in your code after printing all parameters you can free the memory.

free(p);
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char * G(char N[20])
{
    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): "); 
    scanf("%19s", N); 
    return N;
}

int main()
{
    int num=F();
    char p[20];
    G(p);
    ...
    printf("\n The address of 1st char is %p ", (void*)p);
    printf("\n The address of 20th char is %p ", (void*)(p + 19));
    printf("\n The address of int is %p ", (void*)&num);
    return 0;
}

Edit: added pointer casts

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2  
+1, this gives a correct solution, however you need to cast the pointers to void * in the call to printf("%p"). –  user529758 Mar 15 '13 at 5:57
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char * G()
{
    char N[20];
    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): "); 
    scanf("%s", N); 
    return N;
}

Once this function returns, N no longer exists (it's a local variable). So you are returning a pointer to something that doesn't exist.

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The value returned by G() is a stack local address. It only exists in the scope of that function. When execution returns to main, it points at a location on the program stack that most no longer contains the string.

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how can i solve it ? –  VVovoVV Mar 15 '13 at 5:52
    
@VVovoVV Make that function take a char * argument and pass in an array, or make the N variable static, or malloc() some memory and free() it from the caller. –  user529758 Mar 15 '13 at 5:54
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char * G()
{
    char N[20];
    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): "); 
    scanf("%s", N); 
    return N;
}

look into it a silly mistake first...

you cannot return a local variable address....

define char N[20] as global first...

or else change the function definition as,

void G(char *N)
{    
    printf("Type your name (max 20 char): "); 
    scanf("%s", N); 
}

int main()
{
    int num=F();

    char N[20];

    G(N);

    printf("Hello %s, your student id is %d ", N,num);
    return 0;
}
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"global"... really? –  Kiril Kirov Mar 15 '13 at 6:08
    
thats the shortest and least modification can be done ....or else he has pass the string to function..... –  Kinjal Patel Mar 15 '13 at 6:13
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