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How would you write something that selects all possible combinations of triples from an array {1, 2, 3, ..., N-1, N} without duplicates? This is from a recently-held programming competition. N is a multiple of 3.

Example using array {1,2,3,4,5,6}:

C_1 = { {1,2,3}, {4,5,6} }
C_2 = { {1,2,4}, {3,5,6} }
C_3 = { {1,2,5}, {3,4,6} }

are all valid, but

C_bad1 = { {1,2,3}, {3, 4, 5} }
C_bad2 = { {1,2,4}, {3, 5, 6}, {1, 2, 5} }

are not.

share|improve this question
    
Are { {1,2,3}, {4,5,6} } and { {4,5,6}, {1,2,3} } distinct or a duplicate? IE, are there 20 o 10 pssible combinations of triples for N = 6? –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 7:09
    
Those sets are duplicates. The problem is to find the number of ways teams of 3 can be made from N pupils, and to provide an enumeration (like the C_i above). And each of the C_i would have N/3 members. –  user1505713 Mar 15 '13 at 7:14
    
TY. I was approaching it from an enumeration point of view, but no progress yet. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 7:19
    
Is N a multiple of 3 ? –  user1952500 Mar 15 '13 at 7:23
    
Yes, thanks. Edited. –  user1505713 Mar 15 '13 at 7:25

4 Answers 4

you have (N!) / ( ((3!)^(N/3)) * ((N/3)!)) position (prove) . you can just use recursive algorithm for provide all possible combinations of triples from an array {1, 2, 3, ..., N-1, N} without duplicates. but for produce one of them you can use any idea such as user1952500 idea(though This algorithm also generates (N/3)! position duplicate) or every, for example you invariant last-(N-6)-member and put your solution for first-6-member in start of your result.(this algorithm do not generate duplicate position)

recursive solution:

void combtriples(int begin)
    {
     for(int i=1;i<=(n/3);i++)
      for(int j=1;j<=(n/3);j++)
       for(int k=1;k<=(n/3);k++)
        {
         if ((mark[i]<3) && (mark[j]<3) && (mark[k]<3))
          {
           count-position++;
           c[count][3]=begin;
           c[count][4]=begin+1;
           c[count][5]=begin+2;
           mark[i]++;
           mark[j]++;
           mark[k]++;
           count-member-flase=count-member-flase+3;
           if (count-member-flase > 0)
           {
             combtriples(begin+3);
           }
          }
         }
    }


    int main()
    {
     int mark[];
     int c[][];
     count-position=0;
     count-member-flase=0;
     combtriples(1);
    return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This algorithm generates duplicates, as seen by the fact that the first element is not forced to the first triplet of each set. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 14:24
    
Next test:for N=9 does your code generate exactly 280 triplet-sets? –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 15:05
    
c(9,3)*c(6,3)*c(3,3) / 3! =280 –  amin k Mar 15 '13 at 15:07
    
Yes, but does your code properly eliminate ALL duplicates? –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 15:11
    
i think for (N/3)! duplicate is eliminate just by search. –  amin k Mar 15 '13 at 15:32

Since N is a multiple of 3 we can solve it using a trick:

  1. Generate all permutations of the numbers in ascending order
  2. For each permutation, partition the numbers into sets of 3 directly (0-2, 3-6,..., N-2..N)

That should give you your result without much fancy work.

EDIT: I was waiting for someone to spot the issue with the above and it was indeed spotted. The way to fix repetitions is to have an additional step:

Step 3: If any triple is lexicographically unsorted form discard the set. Else continue.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. and to generate the permutations see this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/15122928/… –  eznme Mar 15 '13 at 7:31
3  
This doesn't work. 1,2,3,4,5,6; 4,5,6,1,2,3; 3,1,2,6,4,5 are all the same: a set of {1,2,3} and a set of {4,5,6} –  Dave Galvin Mar 15 '13 at 12:00
#include <stdio.h>

#define SEL_NUM 3
#define LIST_SIZE 6

void printset(int *list, int *map, int size);
void select(int *list, int *map, int n, int size, int start);

int main(int argc, const char **argv) {
  int list[LIST_SIZE] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};
  int map[LIST_SIZE] = {0};

  select(list, map, SEL_NUM, LIST_SIZE, 0);

  return 0;
}

void select(int *list, int *map, int n, int size, int start) {
  if (n == 0) {
    printset(list, map, size);
    return;
  }
  for (int i = start; i < size; i++) {
    map[i] = 1;
    select(list, map, n - 1, size, i + 1);
    map[i] = 0;
  }
}

void printset(int *list, int *map, int size) {
  int list1[SEL_NUM], list2[SEL_NUM], list1cnt = 0, list2cnt = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    if (map[i])
      list1[list1cnt++] = list[i];
    else
      list2[list2cnt++] = list[i];
  for (int i = 0; i < list1cnt; i++)
    printf(" %d ", list1[i]);
  printf(" -- ");
  for (int i = 0; i < list2cnt; i++)
    printf(" %d ", list2[i]);
  printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
very nice solution :) –  icepack Mar 15 '13 at 7:54
    
thanks, feels like it can be refined though –  perreal Mar 15 '13 at 8:04
    
This algorithm also generates duplicate, by not forcint element #1 to the first triplet of each set. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 14:35
    
This also generates an exception for N=9 on this line: " else list2[list2cnt++] = list[i]; ". –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 15:03
    
Does not work with N=9 –  user1505713 Mar 15 '13 at 17:31

Let's consider how many such distinct triplet-sets exist for N. First define T = floor(N/3) as the number of triplets in each set supported by N elements. Then note that since duplicate triplets are not desired, the triplets in each triplet set can be sorted ascending by first element without loss of generality. Then the total number of triplet-sets for N is:

product as t: 0 -> T-1 of ( (N - 3*t - 1) * (N - 3*t - 2) / 2 )

From this formula it is straightforward to see how to build the (brute-force) algorithm to generate the triplets.

Update: The above works only for N % 3 == 0. I am working on a generalization now. Forced; see comment by OP

Cases:

  1. N<3 yields 0
  2. N=3 yields 1
  3. N=6 yields (5 * 4 / 2) * (2 * 1 / 2) = 10
  4. N=9 yields (8 * 7 / 2) * (5 * 4 / 2) * (2 * 1 / 2) = 28 * 10 = 280

As you are in a programming competition, I assume you dont need any code.

Update #2: Note that to automatically eliminate duplicates, the first element of each triplet must be forced to the lowest numbered unselected element .

share|improve this answer
    
do you read my answer? –  amin k Mar 15 '13 at 14:09
    
Not yet. I read the problem just before bed, and woke up with what I then entered here. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 14:20
    
@amink: You generate duplicates; see my note #2 above. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 15 '13 at 14:40
    
my answer edited –  amin k Mar 15 '13 at 14:48

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