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I'm trying to build a hangman game in Python, and I've set it repeat the input function if the user inputs a letter they've already tried. For some reason though, the "guess" variable stores every single value that I try, and I'm confused why this is happening. I only want it to store the most recent input. Here's the code:

def inputGuess(lettersGuessed):

    guess = raw_input("What is your guess? ")
    guess = guess.lower()
    if guess in lettersGuessed:
        print "You've already guessed that. Try again!"
        inputGuess(lettersGuessed)
    print guess
    return guess

And the output (as a note, the first 'a' was pre-loaded to test the 'if' statement):

>>> 
Loading word list from file...
55900 words loaded.
The secret word has 8 letters!
Available letters: bcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
What is your guess? a
You've already guessed that. Try again!
What is your guess? a
You've already guessed that. Try again!
What is your guess? a
You've already guessed that. Try again!
What is your guess? f
f
a
a
a
['a', 'a']
>>> 

The print statement shows that multiple values seem to be involved. Can anyone explain why this is happening? I feel like I must be missing something obvious. Thanks so much!

share|improve this question
    
You call inputGuess from within inputGuess. Maybe you should use a while True: / if condition: break loop instead. –  Dan D. Mar 15 '13 at 6:28
    
Your code never adds anything to lettersGuessed, so I don't see how it ever gets anything in there. Also, you don't show how you're calling inputGuess in the first place. Are you pasting the actual code you are running? –  BrenBarn Mar 15 '13 at 6:29
    
Doing the 6.00SC MIT course? :) I believe that's from the first problem set, right? –  Morgan Wilde Mar 15 '13 at 6:31
    
Indeed it is 6.00SC. I started late so I'm still playing catch-up. And the other variables I call are part of other methods. I simply posted what I thought was relevant as opposed to all the code. Thanks for the advice! –  jtimmins Mar 15 '13 at 6:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Calling yourself recursively like that is a bad idea. Eventually you'll get an exception. The proper way to handle this is a while loop

def inputGuess(lettersGuessed):
    while True:
        guess = raw_input("What is your guess? ")
        guess = guess.lower()
        if guess in lettersGuessed:
            print "You've already guessed that. Try again!"
        else:
            break
    print guess
    return guess
share|improve this answer
    
The problem would be even more apparent if the OP called up the stack viewer in IDLE (with assert False somewhere in his r. loop). –  Morgan Wilde Mar 15 '13 at 6:33
    
Perfect! That fixed the problem. I'm still a tad confused why it printed out multiple values, but the dangers of recursive calling make some sense. Thanks so much! –  jtimmins Mar 15 '13 at 6:36
    
@user2141768, It will save all the duplicates on the stack for each recursive call. You'll see them all printed once you enter a new guess that bypasses the if –  gnibbler Mar 15 '13 at 6:40
    
Ahhh that makes perfect sense. Definitely something good to keep in mind! –  jtimmins Mar 15 '13 at 6:42

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