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I have a perl script for setting up a remote host. And this is its interrupt handler in case if something will go wrong:

sub interrupt
{
    $SIG{'__DIE__'} = '';
    my $signal = shift;
    print STDERR "Error $SELF_NAME: Bootstrapping of host '$REMOTE_HOST' is interrupted with error '$signal', deleting remote temporary directory $REMOTE_TEMP_DIR.\n";
    remote_exec("perl -e \"use File::Path; rmtree('$REMOTE_TEMP_DIR');\"", $REMOTE_HOST, $REMOTE_EXEC_METHOD, $REMOTE_EXEC_PORT, $USERNAME, $PASSWORD, 0, 1);
    exit 1;
}

And this handler is always called when there is a need. So I can see the error about interrupted bootstrapping in STDERR. But exit 1; is not called and script returns with exit_code = 0. BUT if I add this line print STDERR "After remote_exec and before exit"; between last two lines of my handler it works fine (i.e. returns with exit_code = 1).

Note: remote_exec just calls system($COMMAND) inside as I'm testing it on a local host.

UPDATE

Adding some details about how the script is being called:

I run the script from my C++ program which tracks its standard logs and checks exit status and in case when exit status is not equal to 0 it prints some error. So, when I add some extra line in my script between exit and system I can see the error my C++ program prints, but if there is not such extra line the C++ program tells that the script is successfully exited, which means that exit status is 0.

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1  
There is another possibility. If you have an END{...} block somewhere it could be changing the exit code. Do you ? –  cdarke Mar 15 '13 at 9:34
    
No I have no such block. Also even if I had, it would be called for the case when there is an extra print between last two lines as well. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Mar 15 '13 at 10:52
    
OK, that was the only occasion I can think of when the exit code changes. You are making a bit of an assumption about exit not being called. I think more accuratly the symptoms should be described as "the return code is changed". I would suspect the way you are detecting the return code in the caller. –  cdarke Mar 15 '13 at 11:02
    
Some details are added, but IMO they don't make sense. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Mar 15 '13 at 11:22

1 Answer 1

You didn't actually demonstrate the problem, so I had to guess at how to demonstrate it, and failed.

$ perl -e'
   sub interrupt {
      $SIG{"__DIE__"} = "";
      my $signal = shift;
      print STDERR "...\n";
      system("echo ...");
      exit 4;
   }
   $SIG{INT} = \&interrupt;
   <>;
'
^C...
...

$ echo $?
4

(Used 4 cause it's more distinctive than 1.)

What do you even mean by "not called"? You seem to indicate the program did exit as a result of the interrupt, which means it got called.

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Sorry I didn't get your answer. I run the script from my C++ program which tracks its standard logs and checks exit status and in case when exit status != 0 it prints some error. So when I add some extra line in my script between exit and system I can see the error my C++ program prints, but if there is not such extra line the C++ program tells that the script is successfully exited, which means exit_status == 0 –  Mihran Hovsepyan Mar 15 '13 at 7:40
    
I asked for a demonstration of your problem. Right now, all we have is unverifiable claims of a bug in Perl under unspecified circumstances. –  ikegami Mar 15 '13 at 7:46
    
Then it would be better, if you wrote a comment instead of answer, because if someone sees a question which is already answered s/he, more likely, will not open it for giving another answer :) –  Mihran Hovsepyan Mar 15 '13 at 7:49
    
I would, but what I posted would not fit in a comment and would be unreadable. –  ikegami Mar 15 '13 at 7:50
3  
But it's more than a comment anyway. The answers lies in identifying what's wrong with the question, so posting that the question is wrong is the only possible answer. –  ikegami Mar 15 '13 at 7:54

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