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In my MVP applications I use code such as the following to wire my Presenter and View:

View view = new View();
Presenter presenter = new Presenter(view);
view.setPresenter(presenter);

The View class is constructed in a temporarily invalid state, which the call to setPresenter rectifies. I have some code in the View class that throws an IllegalStateException if the View is used without the Presenter being configured.

I was hoping Spring could wire this relationship together with a configuration such as:

<bean id="presenter" class="com.foo.Presenter">
  <constructor-arg ref="view" />
</bean>

<bean id="view" class="com.foo.View">
  <property name="presenter" ref="presenter" />
</bean>

This failed with a lengthy circular-dependency exception.

Is there a way I can tell Spring to construct the view bean, then construct the presenter bean before finally calling the setter on view?


A related question is Spring setter dependency injection after all beans have been created. However, one of the suggested solutions is to resolve the circular dependencies by using setter-based wiring, which is exactly what I'm failing to do here. The latest manual also seems to agree - see the box entitled "Circular dependencies":

One possible solution is to edit the source code of some classes to be configured by setters rather than constructors. Alternatively, avoid constructor injection and use setter injection only. In other words, although it is not recommended, you can configure circular dependencies with setter injection.

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If you use a better container, like Guice, it will figure out circular dependencies for you automatically. Spring is a slow, outdated, dinosaur of an IoC framework. It was great in 2004, but this is 2013. Time to move on to something better. –  rees Apr 24 '13 at 22:21

2 Answers 2

I'm sure that there is a better solution, but if all else fails you can do it "manually":

Configuration:

<bean id="presenter" class="com.foo.Presenter">
</bean>

<bean id="view" class="com.foo.View" init-method="init">
</bean>

View class:

public class View implements ApplicationContextAware {

    private ApplicationContext applicationContext;
    private Presenter presenter;

    public void init(){
        presenter = (Presenter)applicationContext.getBean("presenter");
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) throws BeansException {
        this.applicationContext = applicationContext;
    }
}

As an extra note, if you have annotation-driven on your configuration you can just do @Autowired private ApplicationContext applicationContext; instead of implementing the ApplicationContextAware interface.

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Thank you for the response. However, I very much hope there is a better solution as this requires more effort that not using Spring for the wiring at all. –  Duncan Mar 15 '13 at 8:55
1  
My hope as well. It's an interesting question, I would also like to know if there is a better/correct way of doing this. –  Francisco Paulo Mar 15 '13 at 9:09
    
Looks like there might be, see my answer. I'll leave the question open for a period of time in case there's a better way (or in case my idea is voted down for whatever reason). –  Duncan Mar 15 '13 at 9:34
    
Upvoted, yours seems much better, thanks for the research! :) –  Francisco Paulo Mar 15 '13 at 9:39
    
Thanks. Your answer now has more up-votes - I encourage others to comment if it's a better approach and why. –  Duncan Mar 15 '13 at 13:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Some further research has unearthed a solution. Initially, I tried reversing the order of the bean definitions in the XML config file and it worked:

<bean id="view" class="com.foo.View">
  <property name="presenter" ref="presenter" />
</bean>

<bean id="presenter" class="com.foo.Presenter">
  <constructor-arg ref="view" />
</bean>

However, this felt wrong as I'm confident I shouldn't be relying on file ordering to ensure things aren't breaking. This then led to the realisation that the depends-on can solve the problem:

<bean id="presenter" class="com.foo.Presenter" depends-on="view">
  <constructor-arg ref="view" />
</bean>

<bean id="view" class="com.foo.View">
  <property name="presenter" ref="presenter" />
</bean>

I welcome comments on whether this is a good approach. It's quite plausible I'm bending Spring to my will in a way that's not intended.

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