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I already used the SFINAE idiom quite a few times and I got used to put my std::enable_if<> in template parameters rather than in return types. However, I came across some trivial case where it didn't work, and I'm not sure why. First of all, here is my main:

int main()
{
    foo(5);
    foo(3.4);

    return 0;
}

Here is an implementation of foo that triggers an error (I am using MinGW GCC 4.7):

template<typename T, typename = typename enable_if<is_integral<T>::value, void>::type>
auto foo(T a)
    -> T
{
    return a;
}

template<typename T, typename = typename enable_if<is_floating_point<T>::value, void>::type>
auto foo(T a)
    -> T
{
    return a;
}

And here is an equivalent piece of code that works fine:

template<typename T>
auto foo(T a)
    -> typename enable_if<is_integral<T>::value, T>::type
{
    return a;
}

template<typename T>
auto foo(T a)
    -> typename enable_if<is_floating_point<T>::value, T>::type
{
    return a;
}

My question is: why does the first implementation of foo triggers that error while the second one does not trigger it?

test.cpp:32:6: error: redefinition of 'template<class T, class> T foo(T)'
test.cpp:25:6: error: 'template<class T, class> T foo(T)' previously declared here
test.cpp: In function 'int main()':
test.cpp:42:12: error: no matching function for call to 'foo(double)'
test.cpp:42:12: note: candidate is:
test.cpp:25:6: note: template<class T, class> T foo(T)
test.cpp:25:6: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
test.cpp:24:22: error: no type named 'type' in 'struct std::enable_if<false, void>'

EDIT :

Working code and faulty code

share|improve this question
1  
Ok. Actual demonstration: 1st failed to compile part and 2nd successfully compiled part. –  Mark Garcia Mar 15 '13 at 8:34
    
Additional info: same with VS 2012 November CTP. –  Mark Garcia Mar 15 '13 at 8:45
3  
This should be the perfect read for you. –  Xeo Mar 15 '13 at 9:04
    
@Xeo This was indeed a good read, clear en interesting. And yet another reason to love concepts even though we still can't use them btw :D –  Morwenn Mar 15 '13 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You should take a look at 14.5.6.1 Function template overloading (C++11 standard) where function templates equivalency is defined. In short, default template arguments are not considered, so in the 1st case you have the same function template defined twice. In the 2nd case you have expression referring template parameters used in the return type (again see 14.5.6.1/4). Since this expression is part of signature you get two different function template declarations and thus SFINAE get a chance to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This explanation is simple and clear at least. I had no idea of this rule :) –  Morwenn Mar 15 '13 at 8:55

The = ... of the template just gives a default parameter. This is not part of the actual signature which looks like

template<typename T, typename>
auto foo(T a);

for both functions.

Depending on your needs, the most generic solution for this problem is using tag dispatching.

struct integral_tag { typedef integral_tag category; };
struct floating_tag { typedef floating_tag category; };

template <typename T> struct foo_tag
: std::conditional<std::is_integral<T>::value, integral_tag,
                    typename std::conditional<std::is_floating_point<T>::value, floating_tag,
                                               std::false_type>::type>::type {};

template<typename T>
T foo_impl(T a, integral_tag) { return a; }

template<typename T>
T foo_impl(T a, floating_tag) { return a; }

template <typename T>
T foo(T a)
{
  static_assert(!std::is_base_of<std::false_type, foo_tag<T> >::value,
                 "T must be either floating point or integral");
  return foo_impl(a, typename foo_tag<T>::category{});
}

struct bigint {};
template<> struct foo_tag<bigint> : integral_tag {};

int main()
{
  //foo("x"); // produces a nice error message
  foo(1);
  foo(1.5);
  foo(bigint{});
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's quite interesting too. By the way, wouldn't it be easier to use template specialization instead of multiple std::conditional for struct foo_tag? –  Morwenn Mar 15 '13 at 9:28

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