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I am trying to read from a .txt file that has some numbers in lines.

It looks like that.

example.txt

123
456
789
555

I open this as a binary file for reading wanted to read this file line by line so i know that in every line theres 4 characters (3 numbers and 1 new line character '\n').

I am doing this:

FILE * fp;

int page_size=4;
size_t read=0;
char * buffer = (char *)malloc((page_size+1)*sizeof(char));
fp = fopen("example.txt", "rb"); //open the file for binary input

//loop through the file reading a page at a time
do {
    read = fread(buffer,sizeof(char),page_size, fp); //issue the read call

    if(feof(fp)!=0) 
      read=0;

    if (read > 0) //if return value is > 0
    {   
        if (read < page_size) //if fewer bytes than requested were returned...
        {
            //fill the remainder of the buffer with zeroes
            memset(buffer + read, 0, page_size - read);
        }

        buffer[page_size]='\0';
        printf("|%s|\n",buffer);
    }

}
while(read == page_size); //end when a read returned fewer items

fclose(fp); //close the file

In printf is expected this result then

|123
|
|456
|
|789
|
|555
|

but the actual result i am taking is:

|123
|
456|
|
78|
|9
6|
|66
|

so it looks like that after the first 2 fread it reads only 2 numbers and something goes completely wrong with the new line character.

So what is wrong with fread here?

share|improve this question
    
Your code does the expected thing on my system (linux) – bchurchill Mar 15 '13 at 9:23
4  
If you're on windows, your example.txt probably has not 4, but 5 characters per line, since on windows, line delimiter is \r\n, and not just \n. – user2155932 Mar 15 '13 at 9:24
    
Do a hex dump of the strings you read. Hint: Dos Line feeds. – Aki Suihkonen Mar 15 '13 at 9:25
    
btw why don't you use the debugger and check what's in buffer ? – Anders K. Mar 15 '13 at 9:34
    
windows: end of line in windows consists of two characters, when you open the file in text mode you get only one i.e. \n if you open in binary mode you get the two characters \r\n. – Anders K. Mar 15 '13 at 9:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted
FILE * fp;
int page_size=4;
size_t read=0;
char * buffer = (char *)malloc((page_size+1)*sizeof(char));
fp = fopen("example.txt", "rb"); //open the file for binary input

//loop through the file reading a page at a time
do
{
read = fread(buffer,sizeof(char),page_size, fp); //issue the read call

if (read > 0) //if return value is > 0
{
    buffer[page_size]='\0';
    printf("|%s|\n",buffer);
}

}
while(read == page_size); //end when a read returned fewer items

fclose(fp);

you can try with this code, this code is running fine.

I tried with your code and that is also running fine on my system.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like a simplified version of mine. Well the problem was that i used windows textfiles that had two characters at the end of every line (\r\n). So now yes it works – Blenikos Mar 15 '13 at 10:11

You can use the following to read the file line by line.

   FILE * fp;
   char * line = NULL;
   size_t len = 0;
   ssize_t read;

   while ((read = getline(&line, &len, fp)) != -1) {
       printf("Line length: %zd :\n", read);
       printf("Line text: %s", line);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to read the file line by line in every case. I just want to read 4bytes (pagesize) every time and in that case something goes wrong – Blenikos Mar 15 '13 at 9:38

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