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I have some methods returning Task<T> on which I can await at will. I'd like to have those Tasks executed on a custom TaskScheduler instead of the default one.

var task = GetTaskAsync ();
await task;

I know I can create a new TaskFactory (new CustomScheduler ()) and do a StartNew () from it, but StartNew () takes an action and create the Task, and I already have the Task (returned behind the scenes by a TaskCompletionSource)

How can I specify my own TaskScheduler for await ?

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1  
Doesn´t await expect a hot (aka already running) task? Also tasks from TaskCompletionSource cannot be "run", as one is responsible for completing the task by calling SetResult. Do you mean how to specify the scheduler on which the continuation from await is run? –  sanosdole Mar 15 '13 at 9:26
    
the task is hot and running, while returned by the CTS. But some scheduling happens between the SetResult and the continuation after the await. I need to control that scheduling with my own scheduler, if possible –  Stephane Delcroix Mar 15 '13 at 9:58
    
@StephaneDelcroix Can't you run the whole method on your scheduler? I think that would be the best solution. –  svick Mar 15 '13 at 22:18

4 Answers 4

I think what you really want is to do a Task.Run, but with a custom scheduler. StartNew doesn't work intuitively with asynchronous methods; Stephen Toub has a great blog post about the differences between Task.Run and TaskFactory.StartNew.

So, to create your own custom Run, you can do something like this:

private static readonly TaskFactory myTaskFactory = new TaskFactory(
    CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.DenyChildAttach,
    TaskContinuationOptions.None, new MyTaskScheduler());
private static Task RunOnMyScheduler(Func<Task> func)
{
  return myTaskFactory.StartNew(func).Unwrap();
}
private static Task<T> RunOnMyScheduler<T>(Func<Task<T>> func)
{
  return myTaskFactory.StartNew(func).Unwrap();
}
private static Task RunOnMyScheduler(Action func)
{
  return myTaskFactory.StartNew(func);
}
private static Task<T> RunOnMyScheduler<T>(Func<T> func)
{
  return myTaskFactory.StartNew(func);
}

Then you can execute synchronous or asynchronous methods on your custom scheduler.

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The TaskCompletionSource<T>.Task is constructed without any action and the scheduler is assigned on the first call to ContinueWith(...) (from Asynchronous Programming with the Reactive Framework and the Task Parallel Library — Part 3).

Thankfully you can customize the await behavior slightly by implementing your own class deriving from INotifyCompletion and then using it in a pattern similar to await SomeTask.ConfigureAwait(false) to configure the scheduler that the task should start using in the OnCompleted(Action continuation) method (from await anything;).

Here is the usage:

    TaskCompletionSource<object> source = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();

    public async Task Foo() {
        // Force await to schedule the task on the supplied scheduler
        await SomeAsyncTask().ConfigureScheduler(scheduler);
    }

    public Task SomeAsyncTask() { return source.Task; }

Here is a simple implementation of ConfigureScheduler using a Task extension method with the important part in OnCompleted:

public static class TaskExtension {
    public static CustomTaskAwaitable ConfigureScheduler(this Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
        return new CustomTaskAwaitable(task, scheduler);
    }
}

public struct CustomTaskAwaitable {
    CustomTaskAwaiter awaitable;

    public CustomTaskAwaitable(Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
        awaitable = new CustomTaskAwaiter(task, scheduler);
    }

    public CustomTaskAwaiter GetAwaiter() { return awaitable; }

    public struct CustomTaskAwaiter : INotifyCompletion {
        Task task;
        TaskScheduler scheduler;

        public CustomTaskAwaiter(Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
            this.task = task;
            this.scheduler = scheduler;
        }

        public void OnCompleted(Action continuation) {
            // ContinueWith sets the scheduler to use for the continuation action
            task.ContinueWith(x => continuation(), scheduler);
        }

        public bool IsCompleted { get { return task.IsCompleted; } }
        public void GetResult() { }
    }
}

Here's a working sample that will compile as a console application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Example {
    class Program {
        static TaskCompletionSource<object> source = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        static TaskScheduler scheduler = new CustomTaskScheduler();

        static void Main(string[] args) {
            Console.WriteLine("Main Started");
            var task = Foo();
            Console.WriteLine("Main Continue ");
            // Continue Foo() using CustomTaskScheduler
            source.SetResult(null);
            Console.WriteLine("Main Finished");
        }

        public static async Task Foo() {
            Console.WriteLine("Foo Started");
            // Force await to schedule the task on the supplied scheduler
            await SomeAsyncTask().ConfigureScheduler(scheduler);
            Console.WriteLine("Foo Finished");
        }

        public static Task SomeAsyncTask() { return source.Task; }
    }

    public struct CustomTaskAwaitable {
        CustomTaskAwaiter awaitable;

        public CustomTaskAwaitable(Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
            awaitable = new CustomTaskAwaiter(task, scheduler);
        }

        public CustomTaskAwaiter GetAwaiter() { return awaitable; }

        public struct CustomTaskAwaiter : INotifyCompletion {
            Task task;
            TaskScheduler scheduler;

            public CustomTaskAwaiter(Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
                this.task = task;
                this.scheduler = scheduler;
            }

            public void OnCompleted(Action continuation) {
                // ContinueWith sets the scheduler to use for the continuation action
                task.ContinueWith(x => continuation(), scheduler);
            }

            public bool IsCompleted { get { return task.IsCompleted; } }
            public void GetResult() { }
        }
    }

    public static class TaskExtension {
        public static CustomTaskAwaitable ConfigureScheduler(this Task task, TaskScheduler scheduler) {
            return new CustomTaskAwaitable(task, scheduler);
        }
    }

    public class CustomTaskScheduler : TaskScheduler {
        protected override IEnumerable<Task> GetScheduledTasks() { yield break; }
        protected override bool TryExecuteTaskInline(Task task, bool taskWasPreviouslyQueued) { return false; }
        protected override void QueueTask(Task task) {
            TryExecuteTask(task);
        }
    }
}
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2  
While it is possible to do this, it's generally not a good idea in production code. The original CTP had a SwitchTo operator that behaved much the same way, but was removed because it encouraged unstructured program flow, which in turn caused complications and pitfalls. For example, if you use a modified await in your try, then your finally block would have to be able to execute either on the original scheduler or the modified one (and the finally code cannot switch schedulers since await is not allowed). –  Stephen Cleary Jun 21 '13 at 20:49

After the comments it looks like you want to control the scheduler on which the code after the await is run.

The compile creates a continuation from the await that runs on the current SynchronizationContext by default. So your best shot is to set up the SynchronizationContext before calling await.

There are some ways to await a specific context. See Configure Await from Jon Skeet, especially the part about SwitchTo, for more information on how to implement something like this.

EDIT: The SwitchTo method from TaskEx has been removed, as it was too easy to misuse. See the MSDN Forum for reasons.

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Can you fit for this method call:

  await Task.Factory.StartNew(
        () => { /* to do what you need */ }, 
        CancellationToken.None, /* you can change as you need */
        TaskCreationOptions.None, /* you can change as you need */
        customScheduler);
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