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This is what I'd like to do:

class MyObject {
    @Lazy volatile String test =  {
        //initalize with network access
    }()
}

def my = new MyObject()
println my.test

//Should clear the property but throws groovy.lang.ReadOnlyPropertyException
my.test = null 

//Should invoke a new initialization
println my.test

Unfortunately lazy fields are readonly fields in Groovy and clearing the property leads to an exception.

Any idea how to make a lazy field reinitializable without reimplementing the double checking logic provided by the @Lazy annotation?

UPDATE:

Considering soft=true (from the 1st answer) made me run a few tests:

class MyObject {
    @Lazy() volatile String test =  {
        //initalize with network access
        println 'init'
        Thread.sleep(1000)
        'test'
    }()
}

def my = new MyObject()
//my.test = null 
10.times { zahl ->
    Thread.start {println "$zahl: $my.test"}
}

Will have the following output on my Groovy console after approx 1 sec:

init
0: test
7: test
6: test
1: test
8: test
4: test
9: test
3: test
5: test
2: test

This is as expected (and wanted). Now I add soft=trueand the result changes dramatically and it takes 10 seconds:

init
init
0: test
init
9: test
init
8: test
init
7: test
init
6: test
init
5: test
init
4: test
init
3: test
init
2: test
1: test

Maybe I'm doing the test wrong or soft=true destroys the caching effect completely. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Think this might be a bug in soft=true, I've updated my answer, and will do some more testing... –  tim_yates Mar 15 '13 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Can't you use the soft attribute of Lazy, ie:

class MyObject {
  @Lazy( soft=true ) volatile String test =  {
    //initalize with network access
  }()
}

edit

With soft=true, the annotation generates a setter and a getter like so:

private volatile java.lang.ref.SoftReference $test 

public java.lang.String getTest() {
    java.lang.String res = $test?.get()
    if ( res != null) {
        return res 
    } else {
        synchronized ( this ) {
            if ( res != null) {
                return res 
            } else {
                res = { 
                }.call()
                $test = new java.lang.ref.SoftReference( res )
                return res 
            }
        }
    }
}

public void setTest(java.lang.String value) {
    if ( value != null) {
        $test = new java.lang.ref.SoftReference( value )
    } else {
        $test = null
    }
}

Without soft=true, you don't get a setter

private volatile java.lang.String $test 

public java.lang.String getTest() {
    java.lang.Object $test_local = $test 
    if ( $test_local != null) {
        return $test_local 
    } else {
        synchronized ( this ) {
            if ( $test != null) {
                return $test 
            } else {
                return $test = { 
                }.call()
            }
        }
    }
}

So the variable is read-only. Not currently sure if this is intentional, or a side-effect of using soft=true though...

Edit #2

This looks like it might be a bug in the implementation of Lazy with soft=true

If we change the getter to:

  public java.lang.String getTest() {
    java.lang.String res = $test?.get()
    if( res != null ) {
      return res 
    } else {
      synchronized( this ) {
        // Get the reference again rather than just check the existing res
        res = $test?.get()
        if( res != null ) {
          return res
        } else {
          res = { 
            println 'init'
            Thread.sleep(1000)
            'test'
          }.call()
          $test = new java.lang.ref.SoftReference<String>( res )
          return res 
        }
      }
    }
  }

I think it's working... I'll work on a bugfix

share|improve this answer
    
Your suggestion seems to work. I wonder why, though, since the documentation says soft=truemakes test a soft reference (which as I understand it lets it being considered for GC). Is the property's writability just a side effect then? –  johanneslink Mar 15 '13 at 11:43
    
Just noticed: soft=true seems to erase the effect of volatile (thread safety with double checked locking) –  johanneslink Mar 15 '13 at 11:51
    
@johanneslink updated my answer with the code generated by the ast... –  tim_yates Mar 15 '13 at 11:52
    
Tim, what I tried when reading your updated answer is writing my own setter which uses $testinternally. It's a hack, which requires internal knowledge but it works so far. –  johanneslink Mar 15 '13 at 12:48

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