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In python I want to create a (class) method with multiple dots, in order to make tests regarding xmlrpc methods, which can have method names with many dots. When I try just the following:

class Foo(object):
    def method.with.many.dots(self):
        return 42

I have an invalid syntax. I also tried to use more sophisticated ideas like

class Foo(object):
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        print attr

which also does not work out-of-the-box for method names with a dot. Any ideas how I can create a simple mock object with which I can do something like

mock.some.test.with.many.dots()

in python code in a simple way, without starting a xmlrpc server?

share|improve this question
2  
Python evaluates that as the dots method of the many attribute of the test attribute of the some attribute of the mock object. – whatyouhide Mar 15 '13 at 10:37
    
HYRY's solution is the one you need, but it won't work with with or any other keyword as in your example. – dmg Mar 15 '13 at 10:39
up vote 7 down vote accepted
class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._attr_path = []

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        self._attr_path.append(attr)
        return self

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        print ".".join(self._attr_path)
        print args, kw
        del self._attr_path[:]

f = Foo()
f.a.b.c(1,2,3)

This output:

a.b.c
(1, 2, 3) {}

To fix @Daira Hopwood's problem:

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self, foo, attr):
        self.foo = foo
        self._attr_path = [attr]

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        self._attr_path.append(attr)
        return self

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        print self
        print args, kw

    def __str__(self):
        return ".".join(self._attr_path)

class Foo(object):

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return Bar(self, attr)

f = Foo()
f.a.b.c(1,2,3)

To fix @Daira Hopwood's problem again:

class Foo(object):

    def __init__(self, parent=None, name=""):
        self.parent = parent
        self.name = name

    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        return Foo(parent=self, name=attr)

    def __call__(self, *args, **kw):
        print self
        print args, kw    

    def __str__(self):
        nodes = []
        node = self
        while node.parent:
            nodes.append(node)
            node = node.parent
        return ".".join(node.name for node in nodes[::-1])

f = Foo()
x = f.a.b
y = f.a.c
x()
y()

g = f.a
f.b
g.b.c() 
share|improve this answer
    
You beat me by mere seconds, good sir. – dmg Mar 15 '13 at 10:37
    
Wonderful solution, thank you very much!! – Alex Mar 15 '13 at 12:18
    
This solution will fail if an attribute chain is accessed more than once without an intervening call. You really need multiple objects representing elements of the chain, if you want it to work robustly. – Daira Hopwood Nov 20 '13 at 21:49
    
For example: When you access f.a, the _attr_path attribute of f is set to ['a']. Now suppose you access f.b (without an intervening call); then f._attr_path will be set to ['a', 'b'], which is wrong. – Daira Hopwood Nov 20 '13 at 21:58
1  
@DairaHopwood, I modified the answer again, this time I use tree, I think it can solve the issues. – HYRY Dec 7 '13 at 1:05

This solution will work

Input:

import mock
MO = mock.Mock()
MO.some.test.wyth.many.dots.return_value = 42
MO.some.test.wyth.many.dots()

Output:

42

Note, "with" is a keyword.

Each dotted "descendant" is an independent (mock) object.

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