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I have a txt file like this:

# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# WR
ABABABABABABABABAB
BABABBABABABABABAA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA
# SL
AAABABABABABABBABA
AAABBABABABABABABA

I would like to remove all the data that are for SL and WR (as example). So I will have only:

# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA

I know how to remove one line that start or contain something but no idea how to do with 3 lines in row.

This is what I use to remove lines that contain something:

awk ' $2 !~ /SL/ && $2 !~ /WR/ ' test.txt > test_new.txt

I wanted to know if there is a way to remove all the three lines together.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A pure awk solution using a print flag (inspired by dogbane):

$ awk '/^#/{p=1}/^# (SL|WR)/,/^#/{p=0}p' file
# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA

Explanation:

/^#/ {p=1} If the line starts with a # set the print flag p to 1

/^# (SL|WR)/,/^#/{p=0} If the line is in the range starting # SL or # WR until the next line starting # set the print flag to 0

p If the print flag is non-zero the default block is run {print} else 0 and nothing is printed.

The order is important here, first the print flag is turned on at every new record and only turned off for the records SL and WR.


Using record seperators:

You can redefine what a record is with awk by setting the RS variable. By default each record is separated by a newline but for your example with can use # as the record seperator and only print the records where by the first field isn't WR or SL:

$ awk '$1 != "SL" && $1 != "WR"' RS=# ORS=# file
# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA
#

A small issue with this approach is the last record separator. A simple fix would be to pipe to sed '$d':

$ awk '$1 != "SL" && $1 != "WR"' RS=# ORS=# file | sed '$d'
# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA

Note: the variable ORS is the Output Record Separator we need to set this so the # is displayed in the output.

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This will print an extra # after the last newline.. –  Scrutinizer Mar 15 '13 at 11:01
    
@Scrutinizer good point, simple fix added. –  iiSeymour Mar 15 '13 at 11:12
1  
@mahmood sorry I did not explain what the variable ORS is, I have added a note explaining it. awk lets you specify both the record separator and output record separator. –  iiSeymour Mar 15 '13 at 11:22
2  
If you're piping to sed you might as well use sed to do the whole thing, as in my answer. –  dogbane Mar 15 '13 at 11:24
1  
@moadeep I have added an explanation. Hope it helps. –  iiSeymour Mar 15 '13 at 12:37

Using sed:

To delete # WR:

sed -e '/^# WR/,/^#/ {/^# WR/d;/^#/!d}' file

To delete both # WR and # SL blocks:

$ sed -e '/^# WR/,/^#/ {/^# WR/d;/^#/!d}' -e '/^# SL/,/^#/ {/^# SL/d;/^#/!d}' file

# RIR1
ABABABABABABABABAA
ABABABABABABABABBA
# BR2
ABABABABABABABBABA
ABBABABABABABABABA

Or, as suggested by sudo_O:

sed -r '/^# (WR|SL)/,/^#/ {/^# (WR|SL)/d;/^#/!d}' file
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+1! You could use alteration here inside like sed -r '/^# (WR|SL)/,/^#/ {/^# (WR|SL)/d;/^#/!d}' especially if the number of records is greater than two! –  iiSeymour Mar 15 '13 at 11:36
    
updated, thanks –  dogbane Mar 15 '13 at 12:00

Preprocessing the file:

awk '/#/{print x}1' file | awk '$2!="SL" && $2 !="WR"' RS=
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