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Is there a best practice way to validate user input?

Actual Problem:

A user gives certain inputs in a window. When he is done with those inputs, he can click 'create'. Now, a pop up message should be shown with all invalid input given. If no invalid input, then just continue.

I could easily do this in the Form class. But I remember some best practice way of validating the input in the set properties. Problem is that I already created an instance of that class (or otherwise, can't set properties ;) ) if I validate this way. That should not happen, no instance of the class may be created unless input is valid.

I was planning to create a ErrorMessages class that contains a list where I can put all errorMessages. Every time an invalid input is given, a new message is added to the errorMessages list. So if user click's 'create' button, all messages in the list are shown. Is this a good way of handling things?

So is there a best practice way? Any design patterns that provide such solution?

Edit: This is a school task. So with illogical requirements. I HAVE to show all invalid inputs when I click 'create'. I would like to do this out of Form class. (So validation works even without GUI, I did't even create the GUI yet at this point). First making sure my functionality works correctly ;). I want to keep my code clean, abstract and OOP. So how should I show my error messages?

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closed as not constructive by Code Maverick, Andrew Barber Mar 18 '13 at 14:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'm assuming you're using WinForms? – DHN Mar 15 '13 at 10:53
    
Are you using WPF, Windoes Forms, ASP .NET? All of these have different standards. – rhughes Mar 15 '13 at 10:54
    
I'm using WinForms, yes. But as I mentioned, didn't even create any GUI yet. Srry I didn't mention this before. Now in edit :) – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 11:00
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I was planning to create a ErrorMessages class that contains a list where I can put all errorMessages. Every time an invalid input is given, a new message is added to the errorMessages list. So if user click's 'create' button, all messages in the list are shown. Is this a good way of handling things?

Subjectively, I think it would be better to provide instant feedback that the value the user entered is invalid. That way, they can immediately go back and fix it.

I mean, think about it. The approach you propose would literally give them a giant list of problems at the end, which is not very user-friendly. Besides, how are they going to remember all of those problems to be able to go back and fix them one at a time? (Hint: they're not.)

Instead, I recommend using the ErrorProvider class to display any errors right next to the appropriate control. I talked a little bit more about this approach in my answer here and here.

Of course, you'll still need to make sure upon final submission (clicking the OK/Submit button) that all the input is valid, but then that's just a simple case of checking for the presence of any errors.

I could easily do this in the Form class. But I remember some best practice way of validating the input in the set properties.

Yes, the idea here is encapsulation. The Form class should only know about form stuff. It shouldn't be required to know what kind of input is/is not valid for all of your different controls.

Instead, this validation logic should be placed elsewhere, such as in a class that stores your data. That class would expose public properties to get and set the data, and inside of the setter method, it would verify the data.

That means that all your Form has to do is call a setter method on your data class. The Form needs to know nothing about how to validate the data, or even what the data means, because the data class handles all of that.

That should not happen, no instance of the class may be created unless input is valid.

If this is indeed the case, you will need to provide a constructor for the class that accepts as parameters all of the data it needs. The body of the constructor will then validate the specified data and throw an exception if any of it is invalid. The exception will prevent the class from being created, ensuring that no instance of a class that contains invalid data ever exists.

Such a class would probably not have setter methods at all—only getters.

However, this is kind of an unusual requirement in the world of C# (however common it may be in C++). Generally, placing your validation code inside of the setters works just fine.

My properties have some private setters. So they only get set in the constructor of my data class. Problem is now that this seems to make my validation not eassy

Why would that change anything? You still handle the validation inside of the private setters. If validation fails, you throw an exception. Because the constructor doesn't handle the exception, it continues bubbling up out of that method to the code that attempted to instantiate the object. If that code wants to handle the exception (e.g., to display an error message to the user), it can do so.

Granted, throwing an exception in the case of invalid input is not necessarily a "best practice". The reason is that exceptions should generally be reserved for unexpected conditions, and users screwing up and providing you with invalid data is, well, to be expected. However:

  1. This is the only option you have for data validation inside of a constructor, because constructors can't return values.
  2. The cost of exception handling is basically negligible in UI code since modern computers can process exceptions faster than users can perceive on-screen changes.
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See edit. My properties have some private setters. So they only get set in the constructor of my data class. Problem is now that this seems to make my validation not eassy :s – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 11:04
    
Ooow, so if an exception is thrown, then that prevents the class from being created? Ok, because I'm now setting my properties in constructor. And I'm throwing an ArgumentOutOfRangeException in the property setter when input is invalid. (before property is set) – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 11:05
    
@user1933169 updated my answer. That seems like the right thing to do. ArgumentOutOfRangeException should be used only for cases where there is an actual range of valid data. Otherwise, I would use ArgumentException. – Cody Gray Mar 15 '13 at 11:09
    
Ok, tyvm! Any suggestions on how to handle my other user input? (which is not set in constructor). Should I still go with a message class? Since I cannot validate in GUI (task requirement) – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 11:10
    
Kk, changed the exception. Thank you – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 11:11

See the ErrorProvider class (documentation here). It provides a set of standard visual indicators that can be attached to most of the standard WinForms controls.

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1  
And it's certainly a lot better, from an UX standpoint, than showing errors in a pop-up. – Manu Letroll Mar 15 '13 at 10:55
    
Yes, I know the errorProvider, used it a lot before. But problem is that this is a school task, so with some totally illogical requirement. I have to show all error messages of any input only when I click create button. – user1933169 Mar 15 '13 at 10:56
2  
Illogical requirements are best met with logical solutions. The requirement to show errors only at the end is a bad user experience. As a user I want quick feedback whenever I make an error. Bend the rules :) – Jeff Foster Mar 15 '13 at 11:00
    
@JeffFoster I don't think the ErrorProvider Class is a good solution in terms of Dependency. – Fendy Mar 15 '13 at 11:05

This is a simple requirement but sometimes being debated. This is my "current" approach how to deal with validation. I have not yet used this approach, and this is just a concept. This approach need to be developed more

First, create a custom validation attributes

public class ValidationAttribute : Attribute{
  public type RuleType{get;set;}
  public string Rule{get;set;}
  public string[] RuleValue{get;set;}
}

Second, create a custom error handler / message

public class ValidationResult{
  public bool IsSuccess{get;set;};
  public string[] ErrorMessages{get;set;};
}

Then create a validator

public class RuleValidator{
  public ValidationResult Validate(object o){
    ValidationResult result = new ValidationResult();
    List<string> validationErrors = new List<string>();
    PropertyInfo[] properties = o.GetType().GetProperties();
    foreach(PropertyInfo prop in properties){
      // validate here
      // if error occur{
        validationErrors.Add(string.Format("ErrorMessage at {0}", prop.Name));
      //}
    }

    result.ErrorMessages = validationErrors.ToArray();
  }
}

To use it, then you can do like this:

public class Person{
  [ValidationAttribute(typeof(string), "Required", "true")]
  public string Name{get;set;}

  [ValidationAttribute(typeof(int), "Min", "1")]
  public int Age{get;set;}
}

To call the validator

public void ValidatePerson(Person person){
  RuleValidator validator = new RuleValidator();
  ValidationResult result = validator.Validate(person);
  // generate the error message here, use result.ErrorMessages as source
}

What is the advantage:

  1. You can use in any application platform (Winforms, Asp.Net, WCF, etc)
  2. You can set the rule in attribute-level
  3. It can do automated validation
  4. This approach can be used with DependencyInjection with custom validators to separate validation logics

The disadvantage:

  1. Hard to create the validators
  2. If not handled well, the validators can become very large in number
  3. Bad performance due to use of reflection
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There are several possible approaches:

  • Use "instant" validation.

When user enters value it is checked during input (TextChanged) and validated right away. Create instance of a new class, call property/method what should accept string and return bool (or throw Exception in case of property), on false - draw special error condition (red label next to text box, something blinking, ErrorProvider or whatever you can do what should tell user "wrong!").

This one I like to use, but a bit differently, usually I only check Type and then just trying to parse it straight away in the form. It is possible to abstract more if form operate with the string's and all formattings and validation occurs in the class (property setters). Or you can supply form with additional information (by using query methods or attributes) so it can do instant validation without need to instantiate class or using setters. As example, double factor property can be identified in the form (or even control) to perform 'double.Parseand you can have attributeDefaultValuewhich can be used to display to the user value in the different way when it's different from default (like it is done byPropertyGrid`).

  • Use normal validation.

When user finished input, validate (by trying to set value and catching exception), if wrong - user can't "leave" or "progress" until he press ESC (to cancel changes) or correct his input to pass validation.

This one I dislike. Idea of holding user annoy me (and user ofc). Also it is hard to implement cross checks (like if you have Min and Max values, then user will be pushed to increase "right" one first, otherwise invalidation will fail).

  • Use "ok" validation.

That just means let user to enter everything and only validate when he clicks "Ok" button.

I think combining "Ok" button and interactive instant validation is the best for the user. As user knows where he made a mistake through input, but still is free to browse and only will get a "slap" from validation after clicking "Ok" button (at which step you can simply show him first of errors he did, not necessary to show them all).

Error messages can be provided by setters in the old-fashion LastError way or as a text in the Exception.

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