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I am testing the class which put on the console some messages (with puts, p warnings and etc.). I am just wondering if there is any ability to suppress this output during RSpec tests ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I suppress puts output in my classes by redirecting $stout to a text file. That way, if I need to see the output for any reason, it is there but it doesn't muddy up my test results.

#spec_helper.rb
RSpec.configure do |config|
  config.before(:all, &:silence_output)
  config.after(:all,  &:enable_output)
end

public
# Redirects stderr and stout to /dev/null.txt
def silence_output
  # Store the original stderr and stdout in order to restore them later
  @original_stderr = $stderr
  @original_stdout = $stdout

  # Redirect stderr and stdout
  $stderr = File.new(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'dev', 'null.txt'), 'w')
  $stdout = File.new(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'dev', 'null.txt'), 'w')
end

# Replace stderr and stdout so anything else is output correctly
def enable_output
  $stderr = @original_stderr
  $stdout = @original_stdout
  @original_stderr = nil
  @original_stdout = nil
end

EDIT:

In response to the comment by @MyronMarston, it probably would be smarter to just insert the methods directly into before and after as blocks.

#spec_helper.rb
RSpec.configure do |config|
  original_stderr = $stderr
  original_stdout = $stdout
  config.before(:all) do 
    # Redirect stderr and stdout
    $stderr = File.new(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'dev', 'null.txt'), 'w')
    $stdout = File.new(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'dev', 'null.txt'), 'w')
  end
  config.after(:all) do 
    $stderr = original_stderr
    $stdout = original_stdout
  end
end

It looks a little cleaner and keeps methods off of main. Also, note that if you are using Ruby 2.0, you can use __dir__ instead of File.dirname(__FILE__).

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Thank you very much. –  demas Mar 15 '13 at 13:45
2  
This is a pretty good solution, but bear in mind that it adds silence_output and enable_output to every object in the system. I think it's fine to do so in small one-off scripts, but otherwise I avoid defining methods on main. –  Myron Marston Mar 15 '13 at 15:02
1  
@MyronMarston You are right. Though it may not cause problems since it is only meant to be used in RSpec tests, it would be smarter to keep them off of main. I added to my answer to reflect this. –  Charles Caldwell Mar 15 '13 at 16:14
    
This is excellent! Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! –  josephvilla Mar 15 '13 at 21:40
    
This didn't work for me perfectly. It suppressed some output but not all. I wrote some "puts" within the blocks and they got called several times! –  hammady Sep 22 '13 at 7:35

Try stubbing methods that make the output in a before block, e.g.

before do
  IO.any_instance.stub(:puts) # globally
  YourClass.any_instance.stub(:puts) # or for just one class
end

This is explicit, so you won't miss anything you don't want to miss. If you don't care about any output and the method above doesn't work you can always stub the IO object itself:

before do
  $stdout.stub(:write) # and/or $stderr if needed
end
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Thanks, it works, but I prefer Charles's method :) –  demas Mar 15 '13 at 13:49
    
so simple to just stub out $stdout on the tests that I know will write and I don't want them to, thanks :) –  sevenseacat Sep 26 '13 at 8:51

An Rspec3.0 Version would be => in spec_helper.rb

RSpec.configure do |c|
  c.before { allow($stdout).to receive(:puts) }
end

it will act as before(:each)

but :each is default, so no need to write it explicitly

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If you want to suppress output for a single test, there is a more concise way:

it "should do something with printing" do
  silence_stream(STDOUT) do
    foo.print.should be_true
  end
end

You may want to change STDOUT to STDERR, if your test prints an error.

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1  
I wanted to note that silence_stream is a part of activesupport. –  Andrey Chernih Jun 29 at 17:19

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