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First the layout of my code:

A.h

class STORAGE_CLASS_DECLARATOR A : public PureVirtual
{
   some member functions, all working;
   void someFunctionCallingOperator<<();
   friend std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream &, A *);
}

A.cpp

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream & out, A * a){...}
void A::someFunctionCallingOperator<<(){...}

where the Storage_xxx_declarators are the macros for declspec. I've tried the friend functions with and without the declarator to no avail.

I get an unresolved external symbol on the operator<< function.

From my understanding, this can be due to either:

  1. No body for the function, which is clearly not true as the file is definitely parsed for the other functions, which are working.
  2. The symbol is not being exported properly. Again, I am at a loss as to how this is happening, and in the real scenario, operator<< for A here actually calls operator<< for another class B, and the same error is also shown for that function. Thus, A's definition must be being parsed at some point.

I realize that linking is a separate stage, and that I must be doing something very simple incorrectly, but i have been staring for a while now and cannot reason out theoretically why this is happening, so am turning to SO for help

Thank you, AK

share|improve this question
    
You're leaving out a bit too much code. Can you prepare a minimal, but compilable example? –  Angew Mar 15 '13 at 11:03
    
What are the exact contents of your STORAGE_FUNC_DECLARATOR macro? –  Ephemera Mar 15 '13 at 11:05
    
@PLPiper it is conditionally defined on whether Import/Export_storage_classes is defined. currently it is Export (i am building the DLL), so #define S_F_D __declspec(dllexport) –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 11:09
    
@Angew I was hoping that wouldn't be the case, but I completely understand if it is. Let me try to add in some more detail. –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 11:14
1  
Just a wild guess: is your class definition enclosed in a namespace, and the .cpp includes a using namespace directive? –  Angew Mar 15 '13 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on your comments, I assume your setup is something like this:

A.h

namespace NN {

class STORAGE_CLASS_DECLARATOR A : public PureVirtual
{
   some member functions, all working;
   void someFunctionCallingOperator<<();
   friend std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream &, A *);
}

}

A.cpp:

using namespace NN;

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream & out, A * a){...}
void A::someFunctionCallingOperator<<(){...}

This is a very common setup, but I discourage anyone from using it, because it leads to problems of precisely the type you have now. Let's look at what's going on in A.cpp:

When parsing the definition of A::someFunctionCallingOperator, there's no A in global namespace, so using-ed namespaces are considered, and A is resolved to NN::A.

When parsing the definition of operator<<, however, nothing at all indicates the operator should be put into namespace NN. So this happily defines operator<< in the global namespace, which is in no way related to NN::operator<< introduced by the friend declaraion in A.h. Later, when you use << inside someFunctionCallingOperator, NN::operator<< (which has been declared in A.h) is found through argument-dependent lookup, so it's used. In the end, the linker is rightfully complaining that it was never defined.

The correct way to solve this would be to stop using namespace NN in A.cpp and properly enclose the contents in the namespace, just as you do in the header file:

namespace NN {

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream & out, A * a){...}
void A::someFunctionCallingOperator<<(){...}

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is almost perfect, but I seem to have solved it the reverse way, by changing the definition to std::ostream& ::operator << (std::ostream& out, A * a) (note the anonymous namespacing in front of "operator". Is this not preferred? I am writing the library and have relatively good control over how it is designed and would like to do it the right way! –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 13:43
3  
@AK4749 First off, the global namespace (the one you get when starting with ::) is not an anonymous namespace. Anonymous namespace (namespace { ... }) means something else. –  Angew Mar 15 '13 at 13:47
2  
@AK4749 Second, it's actually the right thing to have your operator defined inside the same namespace as A, so that it can be found by argument-dependent lookup, but doesn't pollute the global namespace. That's what std does for std::string, for example. –  Angew Mar 15 '13 at 13:49
1  
@AK4749 As a side note: shouldn't you make the operator signature actually std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream&, const A&)? The way you've got it, it serves to stream pointers to A, and it can modify the A object pointed to. –  Angew Mar 15 '13 at 13:51
    
Unfortunately the signature is a relic of the old code that the module will be interfacing, but thank you so much for your other corrections! I'll make sure to use the proper terminology from now on, and i now see why "anonymous namespace" had two different behaviors hahaha ok, in that case I'll take your suggestion and refactor the code. My confusion stems from the friend declaration, leading me to believe that operator<< should not have been in A::, but totally did not occur to me that it would escape NN::. Thank you so much for your help and info! –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 14:14

Short answer: Ensure both the return type and parameters of the operator are identical across the definition and implementation.

Slightly longer answer:

It appears you have omitted the return type for the operator. Your friend function definition includes your macro, but the implementation identifies the return type of ostream&. If the ostream& is not included in your macro, this could result in an unresolved external symbol error.

You have also omitted the parameters in the implementation, which would also lead to an unresolved external symbol error if you attempt to use the operator with a parameter (as is normal for <<). The compiler will be looking for an implementation of << with a single parameter (and an ostream& return type), but will only find an implementation of operator<< with an empty parameter list.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer! I can see how that would be an issue. however, as stated in the question, i have attempted it with the #define present and not. With it not present, it is currently: cpp: std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& out, A * a) h: friend std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream&, A *); –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 11:12
    
unless you are saying that in the definition, i should have the STORAGE_FUNC_DECLARATOR again? –  im so confused Mar 15 '13 at 11:18

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