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This is translation from my native language.
You have a class:

class Boo : public SuperBoo {
  Foo* fFoo1;
  Foo* fFoo2;
}

Where Foo - monomorphic class and Boo owns pointers fFoo1, fFoo2.
Overload assign operator for Boo.

My solution was:

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo()
    {}
};

class SuperBoo
{
public:
    virtual ~SuperBoo()
    {}
};

class Boo : public SuperBoo
{
public:
    Boo(const int f1_id, const int f2_id)
    {
        f1 = new Foo(f1_id);
        f2 = new Foo(f2_id);
    }
    ~Boo()
    {
        delete f1;
        delete f2;
    }
    /* C++11 only
    Boo(Boo&& other)
    {
        std::swap(*this, other);
    }
    */
    Boo(const Boo& other)
    {
        f1 = new Foo(*(other.f1));
        f2 = new Foo(*(other.f2));
    }
    Boo& operator=(Boo other)
    {
        std::swap(f1, other.f1);
        std::swap(f2, other.f2);
        return *this;
    }
private:
    Foo* f1;
    Foo* f2;
};

But employer didnt like it. What is wrong here? Thanks for help.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Kiril Kirov, Bob Kaufman, Nicholas Wilson, IronMan84, Michael Anderson Mar 15 '13 at 15:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
For one, it is not exception safe. – jrok Mar 15 '13 at 11:06
    
Agree, that i will lose pointers if new throw – Denis Ermolin Mar 15 '13 at 11:09
    
There's a good solution for this problem of exception safety: use one of the built-in smart pointer classes that use the RAII idiom to solve the memory leak problem for you. – Cody Gray Mar 15 '13 at 11:14
    
@Cody Gray yes better to use smart pointers but i think that test is not to use them. – Denis Ermolin Mar 15 '13 at 11:22
    
Then that's a stupid test. You would never write actual C++ code that didn't use smart pointers. If the built-in classes weren't available (??), then you would write a simple one of your own. The RAII idiom is truly fundamental C++. You don't deal with memory leaks with a mess of code in every single method. – Cody Gray Mar 15 '13 at 11:36

The constructor could be rewritten as:

Boo(const int f1_id, const int f2_id)
{
    std::unique_ptr<Foo> pf1 = new Foo(f1_id);
    f2 = new Foo(f2_id);

    f1 = pf1.release();
}

This way if f2 constructor throws, f1 won't be leaked.

The copy constructor should follow the same rule by the way.

share|improve this answer

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