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I have following code:

/* Example OOPBEI03.CPP  */
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

typedef char item;

class stack
{
private:
    int p;
protected:
    item *st;
public:
    stack(int m=100)
    {
        st = new item[m];
        p = 0;
    }

    ~stack()
    {
        delete [] st;
    }

    void push(item v)
    {
        st[p++] = v;
    }

    item pop()
    {
        return st[--p];
    }

    int empty()
    {
        return !p;
    }
};

class queue : public stack
{
private:
    int q;
    item *qp;
public:
    queue(int m=50):stack(m)
    {
        q = 0;
        qp = st;
    }

    ~queue()
    {
        delete qp;
    }

    item deque()
    {
        return qp[q++];
    }
};

int main()
{
    stack s(50);
    queue q(20);

    s.push('a');
    q.push('b');
    s.push('c');
    q.push('d');

    cout<<"pop   "<<s.pop()<<endl;
    cout<<"pop   "<<s.pop()<<endl;
    cout<<"deque "<<q.deque()<<endl;
    cout<<"deque "<<q.deque()<<endl;
    cout<<"empty queue? "<<q.empty()<<endl;
    cout<<"empty stack? "<<s.empty()<<endl;

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

I get at the end of main() in Visual Studio following error: "Debug Assertion Failed! ... _BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID(pHead->nBlockUse)".

If I uncomment the delete operation either in the destructor of the class queue or stack (I uncomment only one operation!), I have no problems.

How can I solve this?

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1  
I don't see the rule of three/five being followed. –  chris Mar 15 '13 at 11:31
2  
First read about virtual destructors, then about the rule of three, and finally think about what happens when you attempt to free a pointer twice. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 15 '13 at 11:35
    
@all: Thank you for your answers. The problem is, that this code is in my learning book. I'm learning C++ in school right now. –  2-Lee Mar 15 '13 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Deleting qp should me the same as newing (it's term of mine))).

delete [] qp;
       ^^

But in this particular case deleting qp should be removed at all

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the delete[] in class stack appears to already be of this form. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 29 '13 at 19:30

you're deleting the pointer both in the stack base class and in the queue derived class.

let your stack class handle the ownership, don't delete it also in queue

by the way you should make copy construction and copy assignment private, or else handle it (known as the "rule of three"); otherwise these classes can easily be used in ungood ways...


in code that isn't just for learning, just use std::stack and std::queue instead of implementing such classes yourself

std::stack and std::queue are class templates with customizable underlying container type

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, only the destructor of queue gets called because stack's constructor is not virtual. It fails because it should use delete [] qp. But I agree that it would be best to make stack's destructor virtual and let it handle the deletion. –  Kristian Duske Mar 15 '13 at 11:46
    
@KristianDuske: how about trying out such things before posting? ;-) not that results with a given compiler are any guarantee that that's what the standard mandates, but it's highly suggestive. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 15 '13 at 11:49
    
Sorry, you are right. Both desctructors get called. I shall make sure my comments are actually correct in the future! –  Kristian Duske Mar 15 '13 at 11:57

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