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I have defined an abstract class as follows:

public abstract class Move implements Comparable<Move> {
protected int cell;
protected int weight;       

public int getWeight()
{
    return this.weight;
}

public void setWeight(int value)
{
    this.weight = value;
}

protected Move(int cell)
{
    this.cell = cell;
    this.weight = 0;
}

protected Move(int cell, int weight)
{
    this.cell = cell;
    this.weight = weight;
}

@Override
public int compareTo(Move m) 
{
    return this.weight - m.weight;
}

I have an additional 2 classes that extend this class (classed MoveLeft and MoveRight). I add both types of objects to a List of type Move and then sort using Collections.sort:

List<Move> moves = new ArrayList<Move>(someSize);
moves.add(new MoveLeft(cell1));
moves.add(new MoveRight(cell2));
moves.add(new MoveRight(cell3));
moves.add(new MoveLeft(cell4));
Collections.sort(moves);

However, the list is being sorted by cell instead of by weight.

Is it not possible to mix different subclassed instances in the same sort?

Note: I'm setting a unique value for weight in the subclassed constructors.

share|improve this question
    
Do the subclasses override compareTo? –  Andy Thomas Mar 15 '13 at 13:24
2  
Isn't all weight-values 0 since you only use the constructor setting cell-value and don't use setWeight()? –  ghdalum Mar 15 '13 at 13:38
2  
It seems to me that all your weights are 0, so the sorted order is arbitrary... (Seems that @ghdalum noticed that too, 2 seconds earlier ;-) ) –  Vincent van der Weele Mar 15 '13 at 13:38
1  
@Heuster Second place is just the first loser :) –  ghdalum Mar 15 '13 at 13:45
1  
@Heuster Collections.sort for references is stable, so the sort order is not arbitrary. If all compareTo calls return 0, the original order is preserved. –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 15 '13 at 18:11

2 Answers 2

You must create array of Move populate it with mix of derived classes upcasting it to Move and sort it as usual, then you can check you actual class using isntanceOf and downcast.

share|improve this answer
    
No casting required: that is not needed by the Collections.sort() method. In this case it will see the objects implement Comparable and call the compareTo() method regardless of the array type or the reference types that hold the instances. –  Snowman Mar 15 '13 at 13:32

This is really a very long comment, rather than an answer.

I wrote a simple test program, and it appears to sort correctly. The output is [Move [cell=10, weight=1], Move [cell=1, weight=100]], which is neither the order in which I added the elements, nor ascending cell order, but is ascending weight order.

I note that you have two constructor parameters of the same type. I suggest very careful checking that they are not getting switched around. If that is not the problem, I suggest trying to modify my test program to make it more similar to the real code, until it reproduces the problem. Here is my test program:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Move> list = new ArrayList<Move>();
    list.add(new MoveRight(1, 100));
    list.add(new MoveLeft(10, 1));
    Collections.sort(list);
    System.out.println(list);
  }
}

abstract class Move implements Comparable<Move> {
  protected int cell;
  protected int weight;

  public int getWeight()
  {
    return this.weight;
  }

  public void setWeight(int value)
  {
    this.weight = value;
  }

  protected Move(int cell)
  {
    this.cell = cell;
    this.weight = 0;
  }

  protected Move(int cell, int weight)
  {
    this.cell = cell;
    this.weight = weight;
  }

  @Override
  public int compareTo(Move m)
  {
    return this.weight - m.weight;
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "Move [cell=" + cell + ", weight=" + weight + "]";
  }
}

class MoveLeft extends Move {

  protected MoveLeft(int cell, int weight) {
    super(cell, weight);
  }

}

class MoveRight extends Move {

  protected MoveRight(int cell, int weight) {
    super(cell, weight);
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Did that and I also made sure that each weight value is unique. It still sorts the objects by cell –  Ivan-Mark Debono Mar 15 '13 at 13:50
    
@Ivan-MarkDebono In that case, I think your best approach is to work on an SSCCE, either by adding to my test program or by stripping down your real code. –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 15 '13 at 13:57

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