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Hi i have two query's here that run as part of a registration form, upon the user registering information is split into two tables, ptb_users and ptb_stats.

Both query's are working ok. however both tables have an auto increment column, in ptb_users the column user_id is set to auto increment, and at the end of the query the user_id value is set to update/copy into ptb_users.id so that the user_id and id match.

But in ptb_stats id is the auto increment column and again i have asked it to update/copy the value from id to user_id within the ptb_stats table.

i am doing this by using this code:

$result = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_users SET ptb_users.user_id=ptb_users.id");
 $result2 = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_users SET ptb_stats.id=ptb_stats.user_id");

now for some reason this works on the first query ($result) where i am asking it to update ptb_users.user_id=ptb_users.id but it doesnt work on ($result 2) is there any reason why this is the case?

$query="INSERT INTO ptb_users (user_id,
id,
first_name,
last_name,
email )
VALUES('NULL',
'NULL',
'".$firstname."',
'".$lastname."',
'".$email."'
)";
mysql_query($query) or dieerr();
$result = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_users SET ptb_users.user_id=ptb_users.id");


$query="INSERT INTO ptb_stats (id,
user_id,
display_name )
VALUES('NULL',
'NULL',
'".$username."'
)";
mysql_query($query) or dieerr();
$result2 = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_stats SET ptb_stats.id=ptb_stats.user_id");
share|improve this question
    
Please, don't use mysql_* functions in new code. They are no longer maintained and are officially deprecated. See the red box? Learn about prepared statements instead, and use PDO or MySQLi - this article will help you decide which. –  Kermit Mar 15 '13 at 13:23
    
You appear to be specifying ptb_stats while doing an update on ptb_users. –  Kickstart Mar 15 '13 at 13:24
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2 Answers

I would have guess because you're sending a literal string:

INSERT INTO ptb_stats ( ... ) VALUES('NULL', 'NULL', ... 

Omitting these columns would be the easiest solution:

INSERT INTO ptb_stats (display_name) VALUES ( ... )
share|improve this answer
    
i tried this and it doesn't seem to make any difference :( –  James Tanner Mar 15 '13 at 13:32
    
Have you tried running this in a different application such as phpMyAdmin? –  Kermit Mar 15 '13 at 13:33
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A few things jump out:-

$query="INSERT INTO ptb_users (user_id,
id,
first_name,
last_name,
email )
VALUES('NULL',
'NULL',
'".$firstname."',
'".$lastname."',
'".$email."'
)";
mysql_query($query) or dieerr();
$result = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_users SET ptb_users.user_id=ptb_users.id");

You say that user_id is the auto increment column, but you are trying to use an update to give it a value from the id column.

Whereas here:-

$query="INSERT INTO ptb_stats (id,
user_id,
display_name )
VALUES('NULL',
'NULL',
'".$username."'
)";
mysql_query($query) or dieerr();
$result2 = mysql_query("UPDATE ptb_stats SET ptb_stats.id=ptb_stats.user_id");

you say id is the auto increment column, but you are trying to assign it the value from user_id

share|improve this answer
    
yes is this is correct in ptb_users the user_id is the auto incremented column where as in ptb_stats the auto increment column is id so the two are opposites kind of (doing the opposite to each other) –  James Tanner Mar 15 '13 at 13:40
    
Yes, but your updates are doing it the other way round. Ie, you say that ptb_stats.id is the auto increment column, but you are trying to put the value of ptb_stat.user_id into it. –  Kickstart Mar 15 '13 at 13:42
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