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I have a piece of code that calculates a value from "double **times". Let's say "times" is of dimensions [nsims][N] (created with malloc..), where int N=40 and int nsims=50000.

The result is stored in "double **moments". So we have 5 nested for-loops.

The problem however is speed, since this piece of code needs to be run approximately 1 million times.

I am already using threads (not shown here) to split the inner-most for loop into 10 parallel threads, which already saves a lot of time.

Does anyone see other optimization possibilities, especially regarding different data structures or something like this?

Even if I don't have the "interm= ..." formula, it's still taking too much time.

for(j=2;j<=N;j++) {     
    for(k=j;k<=N;k++) {
        moment=0;
        for(i=2;i<=N;i++) {
            for(l=i;l<=N;l++) {
                if(strcmp(mmethod, "emp")==0) {
                    for(a=0;a<nsims;a++) {
                        interm=interm + (double) times[a][k] *
                                        times[a][j]*times[a][i] *
                                        times[a][l];    
                    }
                    interm = (double) interm/nsims;
                    moment = moment + (interm*i*l);
                    interm=0;
                }
            }
        }
        if(!(changed_times[k]==0
             && changed_times[j]==0
             && changed_times[l]==0
             && changed_times[i]==0))
        {
            moments[0][pcount]=(double) moment;
        } else {
            moments[0][pcount]=moments[0][pcount];
        }
        pcount++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
8  
Perform the strcmp()==0 outside the outermost loop and use the resulting bool instead of doing it every time. –  moonshadow Mar 15 '13 at 13:25
    
Do you have the option of using SSE intrinsics? That could save you quite a bit of time. –  Chris Mar 15 '13 at 13:29
    
sorry, yes it is mallocated with N+1 –  user1841373 Mar 15 '13 at 13:30
    
thanks, i will give SSE a try –  user1841373 Mar 15 '13 at 13:39
    
How about using memcmp instead of strcmp? –  jsn Mar 15 '13 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Notice how within your inner loop, you are looking up and multiplying times[a][k]*times[a][j]*times[a][i] every time, even though that expression is the same for each value of a. It could be expensive, both for the multiplications and the memory lookups. (Maybe the compiler is smart enough to optimize that away, I don't know.) You might try caching those values in the inner loop though, something like this:

  ...
  double akji[nsims];
  for (a = 0; a < nsims; ++a) { akji[a] = times[a][k]*times[a][j]*times[a][i]; }
  for(l=i;l<=N;l++) {
interm=0;
for(a=0;a<nsims;a++) {
  interm += akji[a]*times[a][l]; 
}
moment += (interm*l);
  }
  moment = moment * i / nsims;
  ...
share|improve this answer
    
hi, yeah i tried that already and it doesn't make a huge difference –  user1841373 Mar 15 '13 at 14:39
    
k,j,i are constant within the loop over "l". –  gcbenison Mar 15 '13 at 16:02
    
@user you tried exactly that? –  gcbenison Mar 15 '13 at 16:08
    
+1 (I don't think he did). Caching improves the results significantly. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 16 '13 at 8:43

I suppose one should start with a higher level description of the problem.

But as a secondary option, I'd suggest swapping the array indices to make it easier to code a blazingly fast SSE inner loop that combines four (possibly distinct) vectors:

 double times[N+1][nsims], *tend = times[N+1];
 double *j,*k,*i,*l;
 for (j=times[2];j<tend;j+=nsims)
  for (k=j;k<tend;k+=nsims)
   if (strcmp( )) ... /* One _can_ move this elsewhere, but why bother? */
   for (i=times[2];i<tend;i+=nsims)
    for (l=i;l<tend;l+=nsims) {
      interm = efficient_sse_implementation(j,k,i,l, nsims);
      ...
    }

Miniscule optimization could also be achieved by writing different kernel for the cases where there are less than 4 distinct arrays. (In that case one memory operation per stride can be skipped.)

EDIT

The structure of pattern for(j=2;j<=N;j++) for (k=j;k<=N;k++) repeats twice in this case and that alone implies a possibility of much higher level optimization -- what is the operation performed? While struggling at that, this pattern still suggests another method: caching the 780 (or so) subproducts, but at the same time performing loop blocking. This approach should not have the same problem than what I commented to mr. gcbenison.

 for (A=0;A<50000;A+=100) {
    int k=0;
    for (i=2;i<=N;i++)
     for (j=i;j<=N;j++,k++)
       for (a=0;a<100;a++) precalc[k][a]=times[i][A+a]*times[j][A+a];

    for (i=0;i<k;i++)  // Now i loops from 0..779 or so
     for (j=0;j<k;j++) {
       for (a=0;a<100;a++) partial_product+=precalc[i][a]*precalc[j][a];
       // accumulate also partial_product to moment
     }
 }

Disclaimer: this is untried, but there exists some block size (not necessarily 100) that is optimal (and it can be even worse than the previous thing). Also note, that this approach uses a lot of memory for the precalculated table. (Choosing block size of 100 costs 624000 bytes of memory, which sounds rather good. To get below 256k, the block length can be only 42).

EDIT 2:

// Notice that the loop in EDIT_1 calculates both P[2][a]*P[3][a] and P[3][a]*P[2][a].

    for (i=0;i<k;i++)  // Now i loops from 0..779 or so, but... we can limit the
     for (j=i;j<k;j++) { // calculation to the upper triangle of the 780^2 matrix
       for (a=0;a<100;a++) partial_product+=precalc[i][a]*precalc[j][a];
       moment[i]+=partial_product;
       moment[lower_triangle(i)]+=partial_product;  // <-- 50% speed increase
     }

EDIT 3: And here's something to try:

gcc -O4 -DCACHELEVEL=2 -DPOPULATE=1 -DARRAY_OPT=1 && time ./a.out
  • POPULATE initializes the array (assuming that non-zero contents matters)
  • ARRAY_OPT=1 switches the array indices to (perhaps) better order
  • CACHELEVEL=2 or 3 toggles in caching of intermediate results.
  • STRCMP can be found in the source code to test memcmp vs. strcmp vs '1'

NOT TODO 1: LOOP_BLOCKING with cached values -- decreases performance
TODO 2: Upper triangle calculation only
TODO 3: Find out the meaning of changed_times[n] and moments[0][p]
- as it stands out now, none of the computations are saved!

#include <stddef.h>
#define N 40
#define nsims 8000

#if ARRAY_OPT
#define TIMES(n,a) times[n][a]
double times[N+1][nsims]; // [nsims];
#else
#define TIMES(n,a) times[a][n]
double times[nsims][N+1];
#endif

#define STRCMP 1
// vs.
// #define STRCMP1 strcmp(mmethod, "emp")==0

void init()
{
#ifdef POPULATE
    int i,a;
    for (i=0;i<=N;i++)
      for (a=0;a<nsims;a++)
         TIMES(i,a) = (double)((i^a)&7) - 3.5;
#endif
}

  double moments[4000] = { 0 };
  double cache1[nsims];
  double cache2[nsims];

int main()
{
  int j,k,i,l,a, pcount=0;
  init();
  int changed_times[N+1]={0};
  char *mmethod="emp";

  double moment,interm;
  for(j=2;j<=N;j++) {     
    for(k=j;k<=N;k++) {
#if CACHELEVEL == 2
        for (a=0;a<nsims;a++) cache1[a]=TIMES(j,a)*TIMES(k,a);
#endif
        moment=0;
        for(i=2;i<=N;i++) {
#if CACHELEVEL == 3
            for (a=0;a<nsims;a++)         cache2[a]=TIMES(j,a)*TIMES(k,a)*TIMES(i,a);
#else
            for (a=0;a<nsims;a++) cache2[a]=cache1[a]*TIMES(i,a);
#endif
            for(l=i;l<=N;l++) {
                if(STRCMP) { 
                    for(a=0;a<nsims;a++) {
#if CACHELEVEL >= 2
                        interm += (double) cache2[a]*TIMES(l,a);
#else
                        interm=interm + (double) TIMES(k,a) * TIMES(j,a) * TIMES(i,a) * TIMES(l,a);
#endif
                    }
                    interm = (double) interm/(double)nsims;
                    moment = moment + (interm*i*l);
                    interm=0;
                }
            }
        }
        //if(!(changed_times[k]==0
        //     && changed_times[j]==0
        //     && changed_times[l]==0
        //     && changed_times[i]==0))
        //{
        //    moments[0][pcount]=(double) moment;
        //      changed_times[k]++;changed_times[j]++; /* or what? */
        //      changed_times[l]++;changed_times[i]++;
        //} else {
        //    moments[0][pcount]=moments[0][pcount];
        //}
        pcount++;
    }
  }
  printf("%d %f\n",pcount, moment);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, ill give that a try ! –  user1841373 Mar 15 '13 at 14:38
    
As as side note, simply reversing the order of indexes gives ~30% speed boost. It's a bit less than I expected. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 15 '13 at 15:31
    
Calculating the indices as suggested in my first edition of the answer, had about 2% speed increase compared to leaving the index calculation to gcc -O4. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 16 '13 at 6:40
    
Reversing the indices on my home computer gave ~50% boost. And caching the values gave another 40-50%. Also note, that I don't have time to calculate an array of full 50000. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 16 '13 at 9:01
    
Thanks so much guys, I just saw you new comments. Let me try that out –  user1841373 Mar 18 '13 at 8:45

the first obvious optimisation is to move the strcmp() out of the loop.

a string comparison may take quite some time (not much really, but repeating this call such a big number of times makes a great difference). also, this call is likely never optimized by the compiler, while its result is constant throughout the processing. so, store the result in a temporary boolean variable before entering the nested loops, and only test the boolean inside the loops.

also, as always when trying to optimize a piece of code, make sure that you compile using a release target (without debugging informations) and turn on all possible compiler optimizations.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, please use an Intel compiler if you can. We got a 45% increase in speed on AVX platform for a highly mathematically intensive program. –  jsn Mar 15 '13 at 14:16

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