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Consider a major such as Economics. Suppose that a student needs to either take 'EC 101' or 'EC 102' but not necessarily both to graduate from that major. Currently, I have two tables like so:

Courses: CourseID, CourseName

Majors: MajorID, MajorName, RequiredCourseID

How can I capture the requirement that sometimes a major's requirement is: either take course A or course B but not necessarily both in my database design?

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2 Answers 2

A major has requirements, and a requirement can be filled by courses. This way majors can also share common requirements.

major  requirementId
-----------------------
econ       1
econ       2
artOrSmth  2


requirementId     coursename
------------------------------
    1              econ101
    1              econ102
    2              math101
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Schema design

You need to refactor your tables, and introduce a couple of extra ones:

  • Courses: CourseID, CourseName

  • Majors: MajorID, MajorName

  • MajorRequirements: MajorID, ReqId

  • Requirements: ReqId, ReqCount

  • RequiredCourseOptions: ReqId, CourseID

Sample data

From the question:

Economics (EC001): suppose that a student needs to either take 'EC 101' or 'EC 102' but not necessarily both to graduate from that major.

Additional requirements:

Also, the student majoring in EC001 must take all three courses EC 200, EC 201, EC 202.

Political Economy (EC002): as with Economics, the student needs to take either 'EC 101' or 'EC 102' but not necessarily both. Also, the student majoring in EC002 must take any two of the three courses EC 200, EC 201, EC 202. (And, presumably, other courses not discussed here.)

Courses

Course ID    Name
EC 101       Economics 101
EC 102       Economics 102
EC 200       Economics 200
EC 201       Economics 201
EC 202       Economics 202

Majors

Major ID     Name
EC001        Economics
EC002        Political Economy

MajorRequirements

MajorID      ReqID
EC001        R01
EC001        R02
EC002        R01
EC002        R03

Requirements

ReqID         ReqCount
R01           1
R02           3
R03           2

RequiredCourseOptions

ReqID         CourseID
1             EC 101
1             EC 102
2             EC 200
2             EC 201
2             EC 202
3             EC 200
3             EC 201
3             EC 202

Interpretation

Someone who majors in Economics (EC001) must meet all the requirements for their major, which means that MajorRequirements R01 and R02 must be met. To meet R01, the student must have taken 1 required course from the available options. The required course options are EC 101 and EC 102; either one will be sufficient. To meet R02, the student must have taken 3 required courses from the available options; there are three courses (EC 200, EC 201, EC 202), so the student must take all three.

Similarly, someone who majors in Political Economy (EC002) must meet all the requirements for their major, which means that MajorRequirments R01 and R03 must be met. As before, to meet R01, the student must have taken 1 required course from the available options (EC 101 or EC 102). To meet R03, the student must have taken 2 required courses from the available options; there are three courses (EC 200, EC 201, EC 202), and the student must have taken at least two of the three.

Clearly, this can be used to require any N of M courses from any set. If a major M requires a specific course C, then the MajorRequirements table contains a ReqID R for major M with a ReqCount of one and RequiredCourseOptions records R and C. The three courses required for R02 could instead have been split into three separate requirement with different ReqID values and a ReqCount of 1 each. However, I wanted to show the flexibility for 2 of 3 courses with R03, and symmetry suggests that ReqID R02 with ReqCount 3 is better in some ways.

Selecting students qualified to graduate

Which students are eligible to graduate?

Assume a table of Students with columns StudentID, Name and MajorID (and other columns such as date of birth, date of enrollment, etc), plus another table, StudentPassedCourses with columns StudentID and CourseID (and pass date and pass grade, etc). Entries only appear in StudentPassedCourses when the student has passed the course.

Then the students who are qualified to graduate are those who have who have satisfied each of the requirements for their major.

Let's build the query step by step, using TDQD — Test Driven Query Design.

Q1: Number of requirements to graduate in major

SELECT MajorID, COUNT(ReqID) AS CountReqs
  FROM MajorRequirements
 GROUP BY MajorID

Q2: Number of passes in requirement by student

SELECT s.StudentID, m.ReqID, COUNT(*) AS PassCount
  FROM StudentPassedCourses AS p
  JOIN Students             AS s ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
  JOIN MajorRequirements    AS m ON s.MajorID = m.MajorID
 GROUP BY s.StudentID, m.ReqID

(This is a pretty big step; it might need to be broken down into separate steps.)

Q3: Students who have met a given requirement

This lists the students and requirement IDs where the students pass count for a given ReqID is at least the pass count required by the major.

SELECT p.StudentID, p.ReqID
  FROM (SELECT s.StudentID, m.ReqID, COUNT(*) AS PassCount  -- Q2
          FROM StudentPassedCourses AS p
          JOIN Students             AS s ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
          JOIN MajorRequirements    AS m ON s.MajorID = m.MajorID
         GROUP BY s.StudentID, m.ReqID
       ) AS p
  JOIN MajorRequirements AS m ON p.ReqID = m.ReqID
 WHERE p.PassCount >= m.ReqCount

Q4: Aggregate requirement count for each student

SELECT r.StudentID, COUNT(*) AS ReqsPassed
  FROM (SELECT p.StudentID, p.ReqID  -- Q3
          FROM (SELECT s.StudentID, m.ReqID, COUNT(*) AS PassCount  -- Q2
                  FROM StudentPassedCourses AS p
                  JOIN Students             AS s ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
                  JOIN MajorRequirements    AS m ON s.MajorID = m.MajorID
                 GROUP BY s.StudentID, m.ReqID
               ) AS p
          JOIN MajorRequirements AS m ON p.ReqID = m.ReqID
         WHERE p.PassCount >= m.ReqCount
       ) AS r
 GROUP BY r.StudentID

Q5: Students who have passed their major

SELECT s.StudentID, s.Name, s.MajorID, m.Name Major
  FROM Students AS s
  JOIN Majors   AS m ON m.MajorID = s.MajorID
  JOIN (SELECT r.StudentID, COUNT(*) AS ReqsPassed  -- Q4
          FROM (SELECT p.StudentID, p.ReqID  -- Q3
                  FROM (SELECT s.StudentID, m.ReqID, COUNT(*) AS PassCount  -- Q2
                          FROM StudentPassedCourses AS p
                          JOIN Students             AS s ON p.StudentID = s.StudentID
                          JOIN MajorRequirements    AS m ON s.MajorID = m.MajorID
                         GROUP BY s.StudentID, m.ReqID
                       ) AS p
                  JOIN MajorRequirements AS m ON p.ReqID = m.ReqID
                 WHERE p.PassCount >= m.ReqCount
               ) AS r
         GROUP BY r.StudentID
       )        AS c ON c.StudentID = s.StudentID
  JOIN (SELECT MajorID, COUNT(ReqID) AS CountReqs    -- Q1
          FROM MajorRequirements
         GROUP BY MajorID
       )        AS r ON r.MajorID = s.MajorID
 WHERE c.ReqsPassed >= r.CountReqs

Warning: untested SQL!

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