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Ok, so we have the RequireHttpsAttribute that we can use to ensure that a controller/controller method can only be called over SSL. In the case that we try to hit the method over HTTP, the server issues a 302 to the HTTPS version of the same controller (method).

This implies to my users that it is acceptable to issue the first request insecurely in the first place. I don't feel that this is acceptable. Before I trot out an attribute that issues a 404/500 status code in the case that the HTTP version is hit, does such an attribute already exist?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Before I trot out an attribute that issues a 404/500 status code in the case that the HTTP version is hit, does such an attribute already exist?

No, such attribute doesn't exist out of the box.

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If the simply act of requesting the page using HTTP is not compromising any user data, I'd say the redirect should be enough and a perfect approach for your scenario. Why bother user with things we can take care of?

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I don't want any info about the url leaked in any way to any third parties. –  spender Mar 15 '13 at 13:54

This implies to my users that it is acceptable to issue the first request insecurely in the first place. I don't feel that this is acceptable. Before I trot out an attribute that issues a 404/500 status code in the case that the HTTP version is hit, does such an attribute already exist?

If you don't want your application to work at all for these URLs using http:// instead of https://, don't serve anything at all (404 or no connection).

Note that it's ultimately the user's responsibility to check that SSL/TLS is used (and used correctly with a valid certificate). Make sure the links to those address use https:// indeed, and that the users expect https:// to be used, at least for the start page. You could consider using HSTS if their browser support it (or possibly permanent redirects to the entry point that would be cached).

From another comment:

I don't want any info about the url leaked in any way to any third parties

Once the request has been made using this http:// URL from the client, there's little point doing anything on the server. It's too late: an eavesdropper could have seen the request. (If your own page doesn't link to external websites, they wouldn't see that address in the referrer either.) Even if your server doesn't even listen on the plain HTTP port, an active MITM attacker (or more simply, a proxy) could potentially listen to that request and get the URL, without it even reaching your server.

Again: make sure your users expect https:// to be used, and once they're on a secure page, make sure your links/form actions to other sections of your site all use https://.

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I don't think it is too late. There's obviously nothing I can do about the current request leaking information, but it's a much stronger indicator to the client that they shouldn't be doing this than simply issuing a 302... Maybe they'll remember for next time. –  spender Mar 15 '13 at 14:17
    
Absolutely, you're right to want to develop at least with 404 (or similar) for plain http:// pages, but it's too late for those requests. Users generally don't type URLs to go from one page to another within an application (especially not by changing the scheme): they click on your links/buttons. The first request they make will always be problematic: you can use a 301 instead of 302, so that the browser remembers, and of course HSTS when supported. After that, your application should make them stay on HTTPS using https:// URLs itself. –  Bruno Mar 15 '13 at 14:21
    
Not sure how to customise the 404 page in IIS, but you should be able to customise the body to say please go back to the start page: https://www.example.com/. –  Bruno Mar 15 '13 at 14:24
    
That's easy... I'll just throw an HttpException and let the customErrors handler do its thing. –  spender Mar 15 '13 at 14:26

So for reference, here's my new attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, 
                Inherited = true, 
                AllowMultiple = false)]
public class HttpsOnlyAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    private readonly bool disableInDebug;

    public HttpsOnlyAttribute(bool disableInDebug = false)
    {
        this.disableInDebug = disableInDebug;
    }

    public virtual void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
#if DEBUG
        if (disableInDebug) return;
#endif
        if (filterContext == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
        }
        var context = filterContext.HttpContext;
        var request = context.Request;
        var isSecure = request.IsSecureConnection;
        if (!isSecure)
        {
            throw new HttpException(404, "Not found");
        }
    }
}
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