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I'm converting a library over to a jQuery Plugin to make it simpler to initialize. The idea is that the Plugin behaves differently depending upon the type of element it is run on.

If the element is a <p> then I initialize correctly. If, however, the element is another block element, I prepend a <p> to it. If the element is an inline element, it needs to be removed from the list. This is working just fine and the data is attached to the appropriate element (the <p>). For chain-ability, I would like to return the <p>, every time.

If I start with $('p').Plugin({...data...}), it will indeed keep the <p>. If, however, I start the chain with $('div).Plugin({...data...}), the <div> is returned, instead. This is required, because the Plugin may only work on particular elements.

This is the code that is causing me some confusion:

(function($) {   
    var methods = {
        init: function(options) {
        // Maintain chainability
            return this.each(function () {
                var me;
                if($(this).prop('tagName') != 'P')
                {   $(this).append('<p></p>');
                    me = $(this).children('p');
                }
                else me = $(p);
            // The following 2 lines error (I was desperate)
                $(this) = me;
                this = me;
            // The following line does nothing (that I can tell)
                return me;
            });
        },
        ... other methods ...
    };
    $.fn.Plugin = function (method) {
        if (methods[method]) {
            return methods[method].apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        } else if (typeof method === 'object' || !method) {
        // Run Init
            return methods.init.apply(this, arguments);
        } else {
            $.error('Method ' + method + ' does not exist on jQuery Plugin');
        }
    };
}
(jQuery));

I have also tried recreating the list within the init function, so that it only grabs the newly created <p>s. Does anyone have a valid working suggestion to steer me in the right direction?

Note: I'm aware that the above code could me more efficient... In an attempt to solve the issue, it is broken up for clarity.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The return of this.each is always this which is not modifiable and in your case is the list of selected elements that you call .Plugin() on. In your case, you do not want to simply return the list of elements that was selected...but an altered list. (You are 100% correct that your returns inside the .each loop aren't doing anything to affect the return of this.each itself.)

If you define your variable outside the this.each loop to collect your new list of dom elements, add the correct dom elements inside the loop (see note 1), and then return the new list of elements outside the loop, you will see the results you want. However, there are several gotchas here.

Note 1: The reason we use this.each for plugin processing is because the selectors can return multiple elements. You will need to collect a new list of elements since you are basically going to return a different set of elements than the selector selected whenever there is a non-p tag included. The case to consider is $('div.myDiv, p.myP').Plugin() which selects multiple elements with different tag types.

One of the main gotchas is that we often set styles on the element we are selecting or even use the id to help identify the dom element that the plugin is attached to. By altering the dom element that is the root of the plugin there can be a lot of problems with location of css or ids that would need to be addressed or at least considered.

(I am not suggesting that it cannot be done, especially if you are just converting something that you are already using versus building a plugin for general use by others--just that it brings up a lot of prickly issues.)

(function($) {   
    var methods = {
        init: function(options) {
            var mes;
            this.each(function () {
                var me;
                if($(this).prop('tagName') != 'P')
                {   $(this).append('<p></p>');
                    me = $(this).children('p');
                }
                else me = $(p);
            }
            mes.push(me);
            return mes;
        },
        ... other methods ...
    };
    $.fn.Plugin = function (method) {
        if (methods[method]) {
            return methods[method].apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        } else if (typeof method === 'object' || !method) {
        // Run Init
            return methods.init.apply(this, arguments);
        } else {
            $.error('Method ' + method + ' does not exist on jQuery Plugin');
        }
    };
}
(jQuery));
share|improve this answer
    
I did happen to solve the issue. Referring to your note, I certainly understand the prickly issues involved. This plugin does not modify root elements at all. Further, the nature of the elements that it creates are that they are very temporary animations. I've come up now with 3 solutions... I just had to think outside the return this.each box –  Fuzzical Logic Mar 15 '13 at 14:56
    
As your solution is certainly one of the solutions that I came up with, you deserve the "accepted answer". I will also supplement with my own answer afterwards. –  Fuzzical Logic Mar 15 '13 at 15:06
    
Thanks, I appreciate the clarification. I believe I have some sense of what you are doing now. Good luck and I look forward to seeing your full solution. –  purgatory101 Mar 15 '13 at 15:10
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As purgatory101 mentioned, there are really two issues here. The first is to understand that $().each() has its own return value. The second is chainability. Overcoming $().each()'s return value is fairly simple. One just needs to supply a different $().each() or jQuery object array. Chainability comes down to what you/your users need/expect.

jQuery and Chainability

Due to the nature of how $().each() is often used, most assume that chainability refers to that of the original jQuery object that is returned. However, there are several circumstances within the jQuery core where the chain may be continued by a different element. It all comes down to the most likely use of your plugin. Below are the two most common chains that jQuery uses:

Example 1:Result-Oriented Links (ROL)

.add() allows the chain to continue from the result, rather than from the origin. The assumption is that users will want to modify their newly added elements. More common examples are .parent() and .children(), though these are self-explanatory and the natural expectation is that one would want to work with the appropriately named elements.

Example 2:Origin-Oriented Links (OOL)

.append() returns the original objects. This is a direct counterpart to .add() in that it accomplishes a similar end, but returns a different value. This is what the majority of data, style and element altering methods use.

OOL Solution

Since a plugin often has many methods, it is be important to be able to chain those methods. In an OOL, the solution is come up with a procedure that will consistently produce the set of child <p>s every time. This is done like so:

(function($) { 
// Search function
    var findP = function(obj) {
        // ... Search function for your <p> in THIS object
        return p;
    };
    var methods = {
        init: function(options) {
        // Maintain chainability
            return this.each(function () {
                var me;
                if($(this).prop('tagName') != 'P')
                {   $(this).append('<p></p>');
                    me = $(this).children('p');
                }
                else me = $(p);

                // ... other functionality...
            });
        },
        other1: function() {
            var searchMe = findP;
            return this.each(function() {
                var me = searchMe($(this));
            });
        }
    };
    $.fn.Plugin = function (method) {
        ... Route to method ...
    };
}
(jQuery));

The issue with this is that the origin objects may have changed between method calls, so the chance that they might not exist must be accounted for. This is a little more processor intensive, but may be safer and fit the expected behavior.

ROL Solution(s)

ROLs should only be used if the results are going to be acted on right away. This keeps with the same spirit as jQuery's .add, .children and .parent. There are a couple of ways to accomplish this. The concern here is that while this may be accomplished in a number of ways, purgatory101's solution of pushing is the safest. It must be mentioned because the shortcut of using a different $() list may be attractive, but has the danger of grabbing elements that you did not wish to act upon.

    var methods = {
        init: function(options) {
        // Option 1) Build new list
            return newlist.each(function () {
                var me;
                if($(this).prop('tagName') != 'P')
                {   $(this).append('<p></p>');
                    me = $(this).children('p');
                }
                else me = $(p);

                // ... other functionality...
            });
        },
        // ... other methods ...
    };
    $.fn.Plugin = function (method) {
        if (methods[method]) {
            return methods[method].apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
        } else if (typeof method === 'object' || !method) {
        // ... OR Option 2) build new list ...
            return methods.init.apply(newlist, arguments);
        } else {
            $.error('Method ' + method + ' does not exist on jQuery Plugin');
        }            
    };

It should be noted that I am not sure of the differences between the two options are, if there are any.

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