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I have the following list hierarchy:

<ul id="ulid">
    <li><a><div class="mydiv">content</div></a></li>
    <li><a><div class="mydiv">content</div></a></li>
    ...
</ul>

I want to add some css rules to the div and this is what i've tried so far:

var myul = document.getElementById("ulid");
var myli = myul.getElementsByTagName("li");
for(var i = 0; i < myli.length; i++) {
    //myli[i].parentNode.style.display = "none"; // that works
    var links = myli[i].getElementsByTagName("a");
    for(var ii = 0; ii < links.length; ii++) {
        links[ii].parentNode.style.display = "none"; // doesnt work
    }
}

I can hide the li items but cant do the same for a So i cant reach the div. What am i doing wrong here?

EDIT: getElementsByClassName seems not working in greasemonkey scripts as it simply works in Emmanuel N's fiddle.

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2  
How about that: var divs = document.getElementsByClassName("mydiv")? –  VisioN Mar 15 '13 at 14:28
5  
Worth noting that a div tag inside an a tag is invalid markup. If you're looking for a generic inline container user span. –  graphicdivine Mar 15 '13 at 14:29
    
Why are you always using parentNode? And what would be wrong with just doing myul.getElementsByTagName("div") (or "a", not sure which you actually want)? –  Bergi Mar 15 '13 at 14:33
    
Seems like it works fine, check this fiddle –  Emmanuel N Mar 15 '13 at 14:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code seems to work. Check out this Fiddle

  var myul = document.getElementById("ulid");
  var myli = myul.getElementsByTagName("li");
  for(var i = 0; i < myli.length; i++) 
  {
       var links = myli[i].getElementsByTagName("a");
       for(var ii = 0; ii < links.length; ii++) 
       {
              links[ii].parentNode.style.display = "none";
       }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm writing a greasemonkey script. May be that's the reason? –  Adige72 Mar 15 '13 at 14:45
    
Probably that is the reason. –  Emmanuel N Mar 15 '13 at 14:46

Your code actually does work, but I don't think it does what you're intending it to do. The last line: links[ii].parentNode.style.display = "none" will actually hide the parent node of the a tag (i.e. the li) tag, rather than the div. parentNode will go one level UP, not down.

Instead of trying to get myli[i].getElementsByTagName("a") and then working down to the div, why not myli[i].getElementsByTagName("div"), and then simply do:

var myul = document.getElementById("ulid");
var myli = myul.getElementsByTagName("li");
for(var i = 0; i < myli.length; i++) {
    //myli[i].parentNode.style.display = "none"; // that works
    var links = myli[i].getElementsByTagName("div");
    for(var ii = 0; ii < links.length; ii++) {
        links[ii].style.display = "none"; 
    }
}

Of course, there are many more efficient ways to do it. You already have classnames on the divs, so

document.getElementsByClassName("mydiv");

would work just as well.

Or, if you use jQuery, you can do the same thing without having to iterate explicitly:

$("div.mydiv").css(etc.); // style this however you want
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If you aren't opposed to using jQuery, the following would hide your divs for you.

$(document).ready(function () {
    var myDivs = $('div.mydiv');
    for(var eachDiv in myDivs) {
        $(eachDiv).hide();
    }   
 });
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