Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a linear data structure where every node has a level. The parent node has a level of 1, a node that is child of the parent has a level 2, a node that is child of child has node of 3, another parent node would have a level of 1. e.g. below

<node level=1> //parent node
<node level=2> //child of encountered parent node
<node level=2> //child of encountered parent node
<node level=3> //child of encountered child node
<node level=2> //child of encountered parent node
<node level=1> //parent node
<node level=1> //parent node
<node level=2> //child of encountered parent node
<node level=3> //child of encountered child node
<node level=4> //child of encountered child node
<node level=1> //parent node

Essentially I am trying to build a List .. (open to other suggestions), such that each element in the list is a parent node, each parent node will have list of child nodes, each child node can have list of child nodes etc. Each of the element is a node and all properties are same.

I have tried code by keeping track of the current level but than I am not sure how to properly add a child node, that has child node, that has child node, back to the parent node of the first child node. I feel this might be handled best by recursion but I am have never been able to truly implement recursion in a orderly fashion.

My Solution

Here is my working implementation of this traversal. Please feel free to comment on how to optimize this:

Node currNode = root;
List<Root> roots = new ArrayList<Root>();

do {
      Node node = generateNode(nodesList.next());
      if (node.getLevel() == 1) { //implies root level node
         roots.add(node);
         currNode = node;
         index++;
         continue;
      } 
      if (node.getLevel() == currNode.getLevel() +1) {
         currNode.childrenList.addChild(node);
         node.setParent(currNode);
         currNode = node;
      } else {
         while (node.getLevel() <= currNode.getLevel()) {
           if (currNode.getParent() == null) {
               currNode = roots.get(roots.size()-1);
           } else {
               currNode = currNode.getParent();
         }
         if (node.getLevel() == currNode.getLevel() + 1) {
             currNode.childrenList.addChild(node);
             node.setParent(currNode);
             currNode = node;
         } else {
             currNode = roots.get(roots.size()-1);
             currNode.childrenList.addChild(node);
         }

} while (hasMoreNodes(nodesList));

I wrote the following logic to print this structure, let me know if this can be improved:

private void printNodes(List<Node> node) {

    for (int j = 0; j < node.size(); j++) {
        printContents(node.get(j));
        printChildren(node.get(j));
    }

}

private void printChildren(Node node) {
    for (int i = 0; i < node.getChildrenList().size(); i++) {
        printContents(node.getChildrenList().get(i));
        printChildren(node.getChildrenList().get(i));
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Try to reduce that to an usual binary tree and use some known algorithms. – user1929959 Mar 15 '13 at 14:51
    
My understanding is that in a binary tree each node has 2 children; in my case that is not necessarily true since one node could have more than 2 child nodes. – John Brown Mar 15 '13 at 19:43
    
Binary trees are well understood and well explained in available literature. The principles used with them would help you solve your puzzle once you learn them. – Lee Meador Mar 15 '13 at 22:30
    
Yes, i read some literature but again a generic tree might suite what i need, but not a binary tree or maybe i'm just not understanding it well :) – John Brown Mar 21 '13 at 17:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't have to think about all the nesting. You only have to think about where you are (as in, what level was the previous entry in the list of nodes) and where the next entry goes.

In this case, the solution lies in the way the tree is read in. Notice in your list of nodes, which is the tree input source, that right after a parent node, the next node is a child. If the node after some node isn't a child of that node (i.e. if its level isn't one level lower), it is the child of one of the previous node's ancestors.

So:

  1. If the level on line n is equal to one plus the level on line n-1, line n holds a child of line n-1.
  2. Otherwise, go up the tree from the node for line n-1 until you find one with a level one less than the level on line n. That ancestor node is the parent of node on line n.

You also don't have to do it recursively.

currLevel = 0;
currNode = root;
do {
   node = read();
   if (somethingRead()) {
      // If this one is one level below the last one, it goes in as a child and we're done
      if (node.level == currNode.level + 1) {
         currNode.addChild(node);
         currNode = node;
      } else {
         // Otherwise this one has to be at a level above this node's child, so back up
         while (node.level >= currNode.level) {
            currNode = currNode.parent(); // check for root left out here ...
         }
         if (node.level == currNode.level + 1) {
            currNode.addChild(node);
            currNode = node;
         } else {
            // handle illegal condition in list
         }
      }
   }
} while (moreNodesToRead());

Response to Your Solution

Your solution reflects your reluctance to use a fake node as the root of the tree. That's a design choice one can make. Here is my version of it.

I am a little concerned about how you handle incoming data that is fouled up

  1. A node is presented that is more than one level beyond the one before it.
  2. The first node presented isn't at level 1.
  3. A node has a level of 0 or less (no checks for that below)

Also, I suggest you allow currNode to be null when the current node should be the root. Theoretically it could happen in the while loop that backs up the current node but notice that, at that point in the code, you already know the new node has a level above 1 so currNode should never back up beyond the level 1 nodes. It is reasonable to have it generate a NPE if that assumption is wrong.

I suggest these changes:

Node currNode = null;
List<Root> roots = new ArrayList<Root>();

do {
      Node node = generateNode(nodesList.next());
      if (node.getLevel() == 1) { //implies root level node
         roots.add(node);
         currNode = node;
      } else if (currNode == null) {
         // ... handle misformed input ... first node isn't level 1, ignore it
      } else if (node.getLevel() == currNode.getLevel() + 1) {
         currNode.childrenList.addChild(node);
         node.setParent(currNode);
         currNode = node;
      } else {
         Node savedCurrNode = currNode;
         while (node.getLevel() <= currNode.getLevel()) {
             currNode = currNode.getParent();
         }
         if (node.getLevel() == currNode.getLevel() + 1) {
             currNode.childrenList.addChild(node);
             node.setParent(currNode);
             currNode = node;
         } else {
             // ... handle misformed input ... node level > last node level + 1, ignore it
             currNode = savedCurrNode;
         }

} while (hasMoreNodes(nodesList));

Printing

I rearranged it a bit and changed some names and responsibilities (listed in comments). Just to belabor a point from above, if the root was just a node you wouldn't need the 'printRoots()' method at all. Just call 'printChildren()' on the fake root node with level set to 0. But it would print one extra line at the top.

(It always makes it easier to read if you indent the output.)

Warning: Not tested.

/** Print all the root nodes, each with any children it may have */
private void printRoots(List<Node> roots) {

    for (int j = 0; j < roots.size(); j++) {
        Node node = roots.get(j);
        printContents(node, 1);
    }

}

/** Print one node and any children it might have */
private void printContents(Node node, int level) {

    for (int i=1 ; i < level ; ++i) {
        print("    ");
    }
    print(node.toString());
    println();

    printChildren(node, level+1);

}

/** Print each child of the supplied node. Notice how this is just like getting the
 * list of children and calling 'printRoots()'
 *//
private void printChildren(Node node, int level) {

    for (int i = 0; i < node.getChildrenList().size(); i++) {
        Node childNode = node.getChildrenList().get(i);
        printContents(childNode, level);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I see you are assuming that the node knows of its parent, however that is not the case. The level determines what is a parent and what is a child. Essentially everything that is at level 1, is a level 1 parent, anything at level 2 is a child to a parent 1. But neither parent is aware of child nor child is aware of parent. And only level 1 parents get added to a list e.g. level1ParentList, inside of which each parent object has its child objects and so on and so forth. – John Brown Mar 15 '13 at 19:59
    
1) You called it "level1ParentList" and I called it "root". It's the same thing. 2) You can implement the node.parent() method in several ways. I would put a link to the parent in each node. You don't have to do that. For example, you could start at the node and search down through the tree looking for the node that has the desired node as a child. Or you could turn this algorithm recursive with the 1st 'if' causing a recursion and the 'while' causing a return from recursion. Perhaps the algorithm here will give you some ideas of other ways to implement the same thing. – Lee Meador Mar 15 '13 at 22:27
    
I found your answer helpful, but have posted my solution as part of my question. Please review and let me know if that is optimal. – John Brown Mar 21 '13 at 16:50
    
Thanks for commenting on my solution. to your questions: '1:If the level of the node is 2 greater than previous node, then an Exception will be thrown.' '2:Based on definition of the data coming in, level has to start with 1. I will include a clause to through exception if level is less than or greater than 1'. Thanks again. – John Brown Mar 25 '13 at 13:40
    
If you don't mind can you provide feedback on my implementation for printing the structure. Thanks. – John Brown Mar 25 '13 at 20:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.