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I have simple server connection thread. When you call function receiveString, it fails. However when you execute same code in run(), it succeeds. What is needed for function receiveString to work?

I've tried both

bool TestServerThread::receiveString(QTcpSocket& sock, QString& str)
bool TestServerThread::receiveString(QTcpSocket* sock, QString& str)

Actual code:

TestServerThread::TestServerThread(int socketDescriptor, QObject *parent) : QThread(parent), socketDescriptor(socketDescriptor)
{
}


bool TestServerThread::receiveString(QTcpSocket& sock, QString& str)
{
    if(sock.isValid())
    {
        if(!sock.waitForReadyRead(30))
        {
            qWarning() << "fail"; // fails here
            return false;
        }
        QByteArray buf = sock.readAll();
        str = buf;
    }
}

void TestServerThread::run()
{
    QTcpSocket sock;
    if (!sock.setSocketDescriptor(socketDescriptor)) {
        emit error(sock.error());
        return;
    }

    bool ok = true;
    while(ok)
    {
        QString str;
        //if(ok) ok = receiveString(sock, str);

        if(!sock.waitForReadyRead(30))
        {
            qWarning() << "false";
        }
        QByteArray buf = sock.readAll(); // same routine succeeds
        str = buf;
        qWarning() << str;

        qWarning() << "Received: " << str;
        if(ok) ok = sendString(sock, "kaka");
    }
    sock.disconnectFromHost();
    sock.waitForDisconnected();
}
share|improve this question
    
I've tried subclassing QTcpSocket, and I get same results :( – Pavels Oct 12 '09 at 7:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

Either your code ruined the process stack, or your timeout value is not enough.

share|improve this answer
    
My stupid mistake. I've assumed wait time is in seconds, but it is time in miliseconds. Thank you for your answer. Btw, how I can ruin process stack? – Pavels Oct 12 '09 at 8:29
    
But your "wait time out" is the same for on run and receiveString. So run should fail for the same reason! – TimW Oct 12 '09 at 8:40
    
30 msec is really small time frame. – Pavels Oct 12 '09 at 8:49
    
a better way to understand that is: deeper stack if in receiveString. – Test Oct 12 '09 at 9:05
    
what my coworker experienced is: deeper the stack, slower process&thread context swithing on a multi-tasks OS. run() is just a QT thread, and it shares the CPU time with other threads and processes. Btw, normal RTT is 50ms. – Test Oct 12 '09 at 9:23

What is the return value or QTcpSocket::errorString()?

//...
if(!sock.waitForReadyRead(30))
{
    qWarning() << "fails " << sock.errorString(); // fails here
    emit error(sock.error());
    return false;
}
//...

Note that in the run, you are always reading the data on the socket, even if QTcpSocket::waitForReadyRead returned false.
Are you sure you don't get the same error in the run as in receiveString, but the read succeeds because you ignore this error?

Is run still succeeding if you use this code:

bool ok = true;
while(ok)
{
    QString str;
    //if(ok) ok = receiveString(sock, str);

    if(sock.waitForReadyRead(30))
    {
        QByteArray buf = sock.readAll(); // same routine succeeds
        str = buf;
        qWarning() << str;
        qWarning() << "Received: " << str;
        if(ok) 
        {
            ok = sendString(sock, "kaka");
        }
    }
    else
    {
         qWarning() << "fails " << sock.errorString();
         ok = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sock.errorString() returns "Network operation timed out" That of course in function receiveString(). In run() it succeeds. – Pavels Oct 12 '09 at 8:01

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