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I'm attempting to implement a grammar in haskell using the parsec library but I'm having issues with expected Vs. actual types as defined in the grammar, I know the answer to my question is no doubt simple/obvious but alas there is something I'm not understanding...

An excerpt of data declaration follows (should be sufficient to diagnose):

data Expr1 = SeqOfExpr1 [Expr1]
            | Lambda Expr8 Expr1
            | List Expr2 Expr1
            | If Expr2 Expr1 Expr1
            | Expr2
              deriving (Show)

data Expr2 =  SeqOfExpr3 [Expr3]
              deriving (Show)

data Expr3 =  SeqOfExpr4 [Expr4]
              deriving (Show)
 ----------------------------Redundant Code Omitted------------------------------
expr1 :: Parser Expr1   
expr1 = declaration
      <|> list
      <|> ifStmt
      <|> expr2

declaration :: Parser Expr1
declaration =
    do  reservedOp "\\"
        var <- name
        reservedOp "->"
        expr <- expr1
        return $ Lambda var expr

list :: Parser Expr1    
list =
    do exprA <- expr2
       reservedOp ":"
       exprB <- expr1
       return $ List exprA exprB

Now there are further data declarations for expressions down to Expr8 but they are much the same as expr2 -> expr3 the different between them is how they are delimited e.g. Expr3's are delimited by "||", Expr4's by "&&" etc.

One of issues I'm having (which if solved should provide me with the idea to fix the rest):

The List value constructor returns an Expr1 which causes a conflict:

Couldn't match expected type `Expr2' with actual type `Expr1'
In the first argument of `List', namely `exprA'
In the second argument of `($)', namely `List exprA exprB'
In a stmt of a 'do' block: return $ List exprA exprB

I think it's because I'm using Expr2 as a value declaration in Expr1 but I'm not sure how to correct the grammar to solve this issue.

Thanks in advance for any help!

Sean

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2  
Why do you need all these Expr<n> data types? Why not parse them as simply Expr, and then apply type checking? –  pat Mar 15 '13 at 16:47
1  
It doesn't even look like an issue of type checking. If you're introducing several expression parsers due to operator priorities, you still do not necessarily need to introduce several expression datatypes as well, as in the abstract syntax, operator priorities are typically fully explicit anyway. So you can have expr<n> parser functions that all return an Expr result. –  kosmikus Mar 15 '13 at 19:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In data Expr1, you have a nullary constructor Expr2. I suspect you meant that to be something like

data Expr1 =
           ...
           | Foo Expr2

to wrap an Expr2.

Anyway, as per

expr1 :: Parser Expr1   
expr1 = declaration
      <|> list
      <|> ifStmt
      <|> expr2

the compiler infers expr2 :: Parser Expr1, but when you try

list :: Parser Expr1    
list =
    do exprA <- expr2
       reservedOp ":"
       exprB <- expr1
       return $ List exprA exprB

the type of List means exprA must be an Expr2, but from expr2's type, the compiler knows exprA :: Expr1.

So you probably need to wrap expr2 in list,

list = ...
     <|> fmap Foo expr2

if you change the definition of Expr1 to include a Foo constructor to wrap an Expr2.

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