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In the document "Objective-C Programming Language" by Apple, page 48 says:

+ (Rectangle *)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *) color
{
    self = [[Rectangle alloc] init]; // BAD
    [self setColor:color];
    return self;
}

+ (id)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *)color
{
     id newInstance = [[Rectangle alloc] init]; // GOOD
     [newInstance setColor:color];
     return newInstance;
}


+ (id)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *)color
{
     id newInstance = [[self alloc] init]; // EXCELLENT
     [newInstance setColor:color];
     return newInstance;
}

One is bad, one is good, and the other is excellent. Why is that?

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Can you post the URL to that document? There needs to be a bug filed to capture my answer into the docs. Happy to file the bug, just can't find the original document. –  bbum Mar 15 '13 at 16:17
    
@bbum, I also cant find it. –  vikingosegundo Mar 15 '13 at 16:19
    
I don't remember where I found it. So I uploaded it into Dropbox dl.dropbox.com/u/87267422/ObjC_by_Apple.pdf –  DungProton Mar 15 '13 at 16:29

3 Answers 3

There is a fourth pattern....

(1) type mismatch is BAD.

(2) static reference to class yields method that won't behave correctly in subclasses

(3) dynamic reference to class means subclasses will be instantiated as subclass instances


(4)

+ (instancetype)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *)color // Über-bestest evar!
{
     Rectangle *newInstance = [[self alloc] init];
     [newInstance setColor:color];
     return newInstance;
}

llvm added the instancetype keyword that says "yo! this method returns an instance of whatever class it was called on". Thus, if you were to subclass the above, you could:

RectangleSub *rs = [RectangleSub rectangleOfColor:[NSColor paisleyColor]];

But this would warn (beyond the awful color choice):

RectangleSub *rs = [Rectangle rectangleOfColor:[NSColor puceColor]];

Whereas the (id) return type would not warn in the second case.

Note that I also switched declared newInstance to be explicitly of type Rectangle*. This is more better, too, in that within the context of that method, newInstance can only be safely treated as a Rectangle*.

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+1, I didn't know the instancetype keyword. –  vikingosegundo Mar 15 '13 at 16:18
4  
Thanks for the edit. It is new to recent versions of LLVM. NSHipster has a nice writeup: nshipster.com/instancetype –  bbum Mar 15 '13 at 16:20
    
+1 @bbum for the awesome website + answer –  Dave Leverton Mar 15 '13 at 16:38
+ (Rectangle *)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *) color
{
    self = [[Rectangle alloc] init]; // BAD
    [self setColor:color];
    return self;
}

In class method self refers to the class, not a instance object of it.


+ (id)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *)color
{
    id newInstance = [[Rectangle alloc] init]; // GOOD
    [newInstance setColor:color];
    return newInstance;
}

If Rectangle would be subclassed (MyFancyRectangle), this still would return a plain Rectangle object, while

+ (id)rectangleOfColor:(NSColor *)color
{
    id newInstance = [[self alloc] init]; // EXCELLENT
    [newInstance setColor:color];
    return newInstance;
}

would return a MyFancyReactangle if called like MyFancyReactangle *r = [MyFancyReactangle rectangleOfColor:[UIColor redColor]], as [self alloc]is called on the sublass. Note, that here self is again called on the class, as +alloc is a class method.

For the same reason all init… and convenient creator methods should return id. It allows subclasses to return subclass'ed objects without the compiler going mad.

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BAD mean a bad practise or thhis a error or warning ? –  DungProton Mar 15 '13 at 16:09
1  
I'd be surprised, if this would compile at all. it is just wrong and should be triggered by the compiler as error. –  vikingosegundo Mar 15 '13 at 16:09
1  
The compiler will warn w/a type mismatch related message. –  bbum Mar 15 '13 at 16:14
    
Which differ between refer to the class object and refer to the instance ? –  DungProton Mar 15 '13 at 16:21
1  
@DungProton A class method's self is of type Class. In an instance method, self is a reference to whatever class the method is defined on (in this case, Rectangle*. –  bbum Mar 15 '13 at 17:11

In the first case, you assign the self pointer (which should point to the Rectangle class object) to an instance of Rectangle. This is absolutely incorrect.

In the second, you hard code a class to instantiate - Rectangle in this case.

In the third, you allow the class's identity to determine the class of the instance, rather than specifying it explicitly in code. Then, if your Dodecahedron class needs to use this same code, it won't require changing the class name.

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Yeah thank you very much –  DungProton Mar 15 '13 at 16:30

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