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given two vectors:

x <- rnorm(10, 10, 1)
y <- rnorm(10, 5, 5)

How to calculate Cohen's d for effect size?

For example, I want to use the pwr package to estimate the power of a t-test with unequal variances and it requires Cohen's d.

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Kev, I think you should accept an answer, as it clearly answers your question. –  Arun Aug 5 '13 at 13:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Following this link and wikipedia, Cohen's d for a t-test seems to be:

enter image description here

Where sigma (denominator) is:

enter image description here

So, with your data:

set.seed(45)                        ## be reproducible 
x <- rnorm(10, 10, 1)                
y <- rnorm(10, 5, 5)

cohens_d <- function(x, y) {
    lx <- length(x)- 1
    ly <- length(y)- 1
    md  <- abs(mean(x) - mean(y))        ## mean difference (numerator)
    csd <- lx * var(x) + ly * var(y)
    csd <- csd/(lx + ly)
    csd <- sqrt(csd)                     ## common sd computation

    cd  <- md/csd                        ## cohen's d
}
> res <- cohens_d(x, y)
> res
# [1] 0.5199662
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+1, great answer. –  juba Mar 15 '13 at 16:15

There are several packages providing a function for computing Cohen's d. You can for example use the cohensD function form the lsr package :

library(lsr)
set.seed(45)
x <- rnorm(10, 10, 1)
y <- rnorm(10, 5, 5)
cohensD(x,y)
# [1] 0.5199662
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could you set seed to say 45 and compute it again and paste the result? (for reproducibility) –  Arun Mar 15 '13 at 16:03
    
@Arun Yes, good idea, thanks. –  juba Mar 15 '13 at 16:05

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