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I have an iPad app that gets X,Y and Z coordinates from the gyros every 10 ms. What I need to do is store these in the ram until they can be persisted at a convenient time. What is an efficient way of doing this. My first thought was to use a NSMutableArray, but I don't know if calling [array addObject] every 10ms is a good idea in terms of performance. Would it be better to create a linked list or use some other storage method?

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Why are you persisting them? Are they valuable after being a certain age? (i.e. are these values interesting from yesterday?) – HackyStack Mar 15 '13 at 15:57
    
Yes I need to keep them all, they are to be extracted from the iPad later and analysed. – geminiCoder Mar 15 '13 at 15:58
    
video games are rendering entire scenes in < 16ms in order to sustain 60fps framerate. a single call to addObject will be fine. :) – escrafford Mar 15 '13 at 16:20
    
see developer.apple.com/library/mac/#qa/qa1398/_index.html if you want to time small pieces of code accurately. that will allow you to figure out just how much you can do in your 10ms window. – escrafford Mar 15 '13 at 16:24
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Premature optimization is the root of all evil...just start with NSMutableArray and see what you get... – Tim Reddy Mar 15 '13 at 16:46

Let's be specific.

3 float x 100 per second x 60 seconds per minute x 1 save opportunity in 60 minutes = 4320000

It's only 4.2 MB per hour and mean nothing to the capacity and processing power of iPad.

Just NSMutableArray will do.

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Slight exaggeration, since it'd be storing NSNumbers or NSValues rather than scalar floats, but yeah, it should still be well within what NSMutableArray can do. – Sean D. Mar 16 '13 at 0:10

I would take a look at this link: a C array that plays nicely with NSObject pointers It should be right up your alley....

That said, I would use an NSMutableArray until you decide it is not providing the performance you desire.

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