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state (st_id,st_name)
district (d_id,d_name,st_id[FK])
product (pid,pnme)
price (max_price,min_price,pid[FK],d_id[FK])

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1.)This is my table structure, i want to show the price of products in 5 states and its districts,but in price tbl i'm repeating the product(more than 10) for each district.

Whats wrong with my price tbl, Could you plz give an idea to normalize it..

2.) NOw i'm just planning to add date stamp(start date) field to price tbl so that i can maintain historical price list, but how can i do it without repeating product(like shown below) on each date..any better solution to reduce the tbl rows

_______________________________________
product| price |district|date(mm/dd/yy)| 
_______|_______|________|______________|
fan      200   delhi    3/15/2013
speaker  400   delhi    3/15/2013
fan      210   chenni   3/15/2013
speaker  403   chenni   3/15/2013
fan      200   delhi    3/16/2013
fan      210   chenni   3/16/2013
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Paste in SQL DDL to make your structure and constraints crystal clear. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 15 '13 at 16:27
    
I think it's normalized. N says something about table width, not table length. I like your thin tables. (Also, normalizing is oldschool and unnecessary.) –  Rudie Mar 15 '13 at 16:27

3 Answers 3

1) There's nothing much wrong with your table design - however, the sample data doesn't make sense, as there's a repeat for product 1 and district 111. You might want to create a composite primary key on pid and d_id.

2) Again, nothing much wrong with the table design; you might consider only entering data if there's a change, so that retrieving the price for a given date searches for the last record before the desired data. That reduces the size of the table.

General points: please pick a naming convention and stick to it - you use pid and d_id (one with an underscore, one without); in general, I prefer more descriptive column names, but consistency is key.

Also, there's nothing wrong with large tables, as long as the data isn't redundant. Your design seems to have no redundancies.

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Yes! Naming convention. More important than anything else. –  Rudie Mar 15 '13 at 16:30
    
@Rudie: Getting the right answer from the database is surely more important than anything else. Getting the right answer has to do with constraints. It has nothing to do with naming conventions. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 15 '13 at 23:31
    
@MikeSherrill'Catcall' After naming conventions, that's the most important. Naming conventions are SO easy to satisfy, they should always be at the top of the list. –  Rudie Mar 16 '13 at 13:21
    
Ease of implementation doesn't determine importance. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 16 '13 at 13:26

1.)This is my table structure, i want to show the price of products in 5 states and its districts,but in price tbl i'm repeating the product(more than 10) for each district.

If you're offering all your products in all those districts, and the price varies depending on which district the product is sold in, then it only makes sense that you'd repeat the product for each district.

Whats wrong with my price tbl, Could you plz give an idea to normalize it..

It looks like your price table doesn't have a sensible primary key.

If you'd built the table along these lines . . .

create table prices (
  district_id integer not null references districts (district_id),
  product_id integer not null references products (product_id),
  primary key (district_id, product_id),
  min_price numeric(14,2) not null,
  max_price numeric(14,2) not null
);

you'd have a table in 5NF, assuming that minimum and maximum product prices vary among the districts. But your sample data couldn't possibly fit in it.

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1) In your Price (Price Range) table, I don't understand why (d_id, pid) repeats? There should be only one price range, unless you put an effective date column in the table.

2) You could have a future price table, a current price table, and a history price table. This allows you to enter price changes in advance, keeps the current price table short and allows you to get the historical prices infrequently when you need them. Your application code maintains the relationship between these price tables.

I'm not sure where city came from in your other Price table, since you defined state and district.

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In my price tbl, price of product vary in different district so i'm repeating d_id (district id) & pid (product id)... what changes need to be done in my table –  Kumar Htabmas Mar 15 '13 at 16:28
    
The combination of d_id and pid in your Price Range table has to be unique. One price range per item, per district. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Mar 15 '13 at 16:31

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