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Working with the following:

string strSelectSql = "SELECT Table1.ID, Table1.Status,  
    Table1.CustomerName,Table1.Date, Table1.LocationID, 
    Table2.LocationID As [LocationID 2] FROM Table1 LEFT JOIN 
    Table2 ON Table1.ID = Table2.ID 
    WHERE (Date Is Null AND ID= @SearchForString AND 
    Status != 'Archived') OR 
    ((Date Between @FromDate AND @ToDate) 
     AND ID= @SearchForString AND Status != 'Archived')";

        SqlConnection SqlConn = new SqlConnection(cstrDatabaseConnection);
        SqlDataAdapter SqlAdpt = new SqlDataAdapter();
        SqlCommand SqlCom = new SqlCommand(strSelectSql,SqlConn);
        SqlCom.Parameters.AddWithValue("@SearchForString",strSearchString);
        SqlCom.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FromDate",strFromDate);
        SqlCom.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ToDate",strToDate );

        SqlAdpt.SelectCommand = SqlCom;
        try
        {
            DataSet TempDS = new DataSet();
            SqlConn.Open();
            SqlAdpt.Fill(TempDS);
            SqlConn.Close();
            SqlConn.Dispose();
            if (Convert.ToInt32(TempDS.Tables[0].Rows.Count) > 0)
            {
                dgvQueryResult.DataSource = TempDS.Tables[0];
                dgvQueryResult.Refresh();
                dgvQueryResult.AutoResizeColumns(DataGridViewAutoSizeColumnsMode.AllCells);
                TempDS.Dispose();
            }

        }
        catch (SqlException sqlE)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(sqlE.Message);
            SqlConn.Close();
            SqlConn.Dispose();
        }
        catch (Exception UnknownE)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(string.Format("Unknown Exception: {0}",UnknownE.Message);
            SqlConn.Close();
            SqlConn.Dispose();
        }
        finally
        {
            if (SqlConn != null) SqlConn.Dispose();
        }

Now this all works fine and dandy unless Table2 has Multiple values for LocationID

Table2
+----+------------+
| ID | LocationID |
+----+------------+
| 1  |     1      |
| 2  |     2      |
| 3  |     3      |
| 4  |     4      |
| 5  |     5      |
| 6  |     6      |
| 6  |     7      |
| 6  |     7      |
| 7  |     8      |
| 7  |     9      |
+----+------------+

I want to ignore the:

Table2
+----+------------+
| ID | LocationID |
+----+------------+
| 6  |     7      |
| 6  |     7      |
+----+------------+

and Get this:

Table2
+----+------------+
| ID | LocationID |
+----+------------+
| 1  |     1      |
| 2  |     2      |
| 3  |     3      |
| 4  |     4      |
| 5  |     5      |
| 6  |     6      |
| 7  |     8      |
| 7  |     9      |
+----+------------+

but I do want the:

Table2
+----+------------+
| ID | LocationID |
+----+------------+
| 6  |     6      |
+----+------------+

Because the LocationID is not duplicated.

Also, I DO want:

Table2
+----+------------+
| ID | LocationID |
+----+------------+
| 7  |     8      |
| 7  |     9      |
+----+------------+

again because the LocationID is not duplicated.

If I have to or if it will be more Efficient I also willing to remove these rows from the TempDS before:

        dgvQueryResult.DataSource = TempDS.Tables[0];

If even if need be or if most efficient remove the entries right from dgvQueryResult

share|improve this question
    
Do a CTE first to get items with count > 1 and then add to where clause to exclude those. I'd give you SQL but I have to go to a meeting. –  Hogan Mar 15 '13 at 16:14
    
if you are not familiar with how to create a Common Table Expression(CTE) you can look at this MSDN Site CTE SQL Server –  DJ KRAZE Mar 15 '13 at 16:19
    
@Hogan I did try that but was unsure of the sytax, as I added any form of a WITH to the beginning of strSelectSql I got a SqlException. I have never used CTE before or the Having Count(*)= 1 Function before. And can't find many great documentations on the subject especially when using it inside C#. –  user2140261 Mar 15 '13 at 16:21
    
@user2140261 I often prepend a semi-colon to with since SQL Server likes to complain about it: ;with –  Tim Lehner Mar 15 '13 at 16:30
    
@user2140261 - Paul's answer is good, but here is a simple example >> WITH ctename as ( SELECT * FROM table ) SELECT * FROM ctename –  Hogan Mar 15 '13 at 18:28
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

instead of

LEFT JOIN Table2

try:

LEFT JOIN (Select id, locationId from table2 group by id, locationId having count(*) = 1) as table2

share|improve this answer
    
This worked exactly as I expected this was actually almost identical to what i had in my head and tried originally, not sure why mine didn't work but this worked great. How does this compare to what other users where saying to try, The CTE route as they seem to be almost the same thing to me. –  user2140261 Mar 15 '13 at 16:33
    
I believe it's a matter of preference. Using a CTE should optimize to exactly the same plan. I presonally find CTEs more readable when subqueries become more complicated, but use subqueries for more trivial cases. –  paul Mar 15 '13 at 16:38
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