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I have the query:

SELECT `gigs`.*, COUNT(`signups`.`signupID`) AS `signupsPending` FROM `gigs` NATURAL JOIN `signups` WHERE (`signupStatus` = 4) GROUP BY `gigID`

That is querying a database that looks like this:

+-------+---------+------------+
| gigID | gigName | gigDate    |
+-------+---------+------------+
| 1     | Foo     | 01/01/2014 |
+-------+---------+------------+
| 2     | Bar     | 16/01/2014 |
+-------+---------+------------+


+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+
| signupID | gigID | signedUserID | signupStatus |
+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+
| 1        | 1     | 1            | 1            |
+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+
| 2        | 1     | 2            | 4            |
+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+
| 3        | 1     | 3            | 2            |
+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+
| 4        | 2     | 1            | 2            |
+----------+-------+--------------+--------------+

But when I do the query above, it only shows a row for gigID = 1. How can I alter the above query so it will show 0 with the rest of the row?

share|improve this question
    
outer join mate: mysql-tips.blogspot.co.uk/2005/04/… –  Raad Mar 15 '13 at 16:40
    
I did try an outer join, but nothing else happened –  topherg Mar 15 '13 at 16:44
    
sorry mate - terminology ambiguity. LEFT and LEFT OUTER are the same, and to complicate things I tend to treat OUTER and LEFT interchangeably (me bad). –  Raad Mar 15 '13 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

Use LEFT OUTER JOIN instead of NATURAL JOIN.

SELECT `gigs`.*, COUNT(`signups`.`signupID`) AS `signupsPending` 
FROM `gigs` 
LEFT OUTER JOIN `signups` 
WHERE (`signupStatus` = 4) GROUP BY `gigID`
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have been trying OUTER JOIN's, but that has not yielded any results, but I have now tried:

SELECT `gigs`.*, COUNT(`signups`.`signupID`) AS `signupsPending` FROM `gigs` LEFT JOIN `signups` ON `gigs`.`gigID` = `signups`.`gigID` AND `signupStatus` = 4 GROUP BY `gigID`

And that is working great

share|improve this answer

You want to use LEFT JOIN (to which you can add OUTER for ANSI-92 compatibility)

SELECT
  gig.*
, COUNT(sig.signupID) AS "signupsPending"
FROM gigs AS gig
LEFT JOIN signups AS sig ON (gig.gigID = sig.gigID)
WHERE sig.signupStatus = 4
GROUP BY gig.gigID

Btw I advise you not to use NATURAL JOIN because it brings several risks

  • It's based on field names and you may have different field names as foreign keys
  • Different foreign keys can be used to JOIN 2 tables (even if you can add a USING statement)
  • During your database life tables can get field changed added, and you will always have to check that both tables don't get new fields with the same name
  • If you use both NATURAL and standard JOINs it can be difficult to automate your queries through scripts
  • ...
share|improve this answer
    
I did try converting from NATURAL JOIN to LEFT JOIN, but as a matter of principle, I tend to stick to keeping the foreign key ID matching the local key ID, but I get your point –  topherg Mar 15 '13 at 16:48
    
Also 2 tables are not always JOINt with the same keys. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Mar 15 '13 at 16:52
    
I have definately experienced that issue with it throwing the error, field name was ambiguous, even though they where the same, and in those cases, I always use LEFT JOIN's –  topherg Mar 15 '13 at 16:54

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