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Hard for me to believe I've been using Linq this long and can't figure this out...I must have done it before, but my brain is failing me.

The gist of what I want to do is

from a in A
join b in B on a.aId equals b.aId into Bees
join c in C on b.bId equals c.bId into Cees
select new { a.id, Bees, Cees }

Can this be done and if so how? I get "cannot resolve symbol b" and if I change b to Bees in the c join condition, of course that is a collection, so I cant join on the id...

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1  
Are you sure you want to be doing a group join and not just a regular join? –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 16:54
    
Yeah, I just need an object containing all the b's and all the c's for each a :) –  µBio Mar 15 '13 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Keep in mind that by the time you get to the join c line b doesn't exist because it's in the collection Bees. Since you're joining on some other ID, besides the ID in a, there isn't just one ID to join on. You'd need to join b with c for each collection of Bees.

from a in A
join b in B on a.aId equals  b.aId into Bees
select new { a.id, Bees, 
    Cees = from b in Bees 
    join c in C on b.bId equals c.bId
    select v}

It would make a lot more sense if this wasn't doing a group join, and instead was doing a regular join:

from a in A
join b in B on a.aId equals b.aId
join c in C on b.bId equals c.bId
select new { a.id, b, c}

Now not knowing the context of your problem, it's hard to say if this or is not helpful in solving your true problem.

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Thanks. I get what you are saying, but in this case I really do want to flatten it out. A similar situation would be if you wanted to collapse a customer object to a collection of the orders and all the products they had ordered (as separate collections), which I believe @axrwkr has provided in their solution. –  µBio Mar 15 '13 at 20:11
    
On second look, he/she has almost what I want...I am looking to get one 'a' which contains collections for the b's and c's...but his answer got me over my brain hurdle I think –  µBio Mar 15 '13 at 20:24
    
@µBio I provided both solutions, whether you want a group join or a regular join. Note that my first solution is effectively the same as his solution. It's just written out slightly differently but does the same thing. –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 20:27
    
@axrwkr It does, it's just not structured identically. In the other answer they're flattened, so it's simply a collection of all of the C objects related to the A object, whereas in my solution they're grouped based on the B object they're related to. If you don't care about that grouping, adding a SelectMany cause can flatten the list. –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 20:40
1  
@µBio Actually, if you want the C object flattened you can just use a regular Join rather than a group join for the inner join, i.e. remove the into group and just select c. –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 20:42
from a in A
join b in B
on a.aId equals b.aId into Bees
from bs in Bees
join c in C 
on bs.bId equals c.bId into Cees
select new { a.Id, Bees, Cees };

the class definitions

class AA
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int aId { get; set; }
}

class BB
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int aId { get; set; }
    public int bId { get; set; }
}

class CC
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int bId { get; set; }
}

the main program

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var A = new List<AA>();
        var B = new List<BB>();
        var C = new List<CC>();

        // make up some data
        var bid = 1;
        var cid = 1;
        for (var a = 1; a < 4; a++)
        {
            A.Add(new AA { Id = a, aId = a });

            for (var b = 1; b < 4; b++)
            {
                B.Add(new BB { Id = bid++, aId = a, bId = b });

                for (var c = 1; c < 4; c++)
                    C.Add(new CC { Id = cid++, bId = b });
            }
        }

        // display the item count for each list
        Console.WriteLine("A: {0}", A.Count());
        Console.WriteLine("B: {0}", B.Count());
        Console.WriteLine("C: {0}", C.Count());

        // define the query
        var abc = from a in A
                  join b in B
                  on a.aId equals b.aId into Bees
                  from bs in Bees
                  join c in C 
                  on bs.bId equals c.bId into Cees
                  select new { a.Id, Bees, Cees };

        // display the results of the query in the console
        foreach (var x in abc)
        {
            var bees = x.Bees.Count();
            var cees = x.Cees.Count();
            var str = String.Format("Id: {0}, Bees: {1}, Cees: {2} ", x.Id, bees, cees);
            Console.WriteLine(str);
        }
     }
}

output

A: 3
B: 9
C: 27

Id: 1, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 1, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 1, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 2, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 2, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 2, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 3, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 3, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
Id: 3, Bees: 3, Cees: 9
share|improve this answer
    
won't b be out of scope by the 3rd line though? –  Servy Mar 15 '13 at 16:57
    
sorry, the == just came from transcribing real code into a simple example...my code uses 'equals' of course –  µBio Mar 15 '13 at 16:57
    
Thanks, that's the insight I was looking for :) for output, I'm just taking a highly relational model and collapsing it for a document database import, so I really just want an object graph with collections for all the related tables. This was perfect. –  µBio Mar 15 '13 at 20:00

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