Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I call a GetType on a int- or a DateTime-property, I get the expected results, but on a string-property, I get a NullReferenceException (?) :

private int      PropInt    { get; set; }
private DateTime PropDate   { get; set; }
private string   propString { get; set; }

WriteLine(PropInt.GetType().ToString());    // Result : System.Int32
WriteLine(PropDate.GetType().ToString());   // Result : System.DateTime
WriteLine(propString.GetType().ToString()); // Result : NullReferenceException (?!)

Can someone explain how come ? In what way differs a string-prop from a int-prop ?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

If the property's value is null, then you'll get a NullReferenceException when trying to access object methods or properties, like GetType(). Primitive types like int and DateTime are value types, and as such cannot hold a null value, which is why GetType() won't fail any more than any of their other member functions.

share|improve this answer

To emphasize what the other answers have indicated, change int to int? and DateTime to DateTime? and try running the code again. Since those values can now hold nulls, you will get the same exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually this is incorrect. While you can assign a Nullable<T> to null and compare it to null, the value is not actually null. Nullable<T> is a struct and has to follow all value type conventions, such as not being able to store null. The assignment and comparison is just syntactic sugar for the parameterless constructor and for checking the HasValue property, respectively. –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '09 at 13:56
    
No; Bomlin is correct; an uninitialised Nullable<T> throws an exception on GetType(); see here for why: stackoverflow.com/questions/194484/… –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '09 at 15:32

Because string is a reference type where the others are not. The DateTime and the Int have to have values by default, they can't be null.

What you have to understand is the the compiler is creating a variable for you to store the information. In C# 3.0 you don't have to explicitly declare it, but it is still there, so it's creating a DateTime variable and an int variable and initializing them to their default values so not to cause a compiler error. With a string, it doesn't need to do this (initialize a default value), because it's a reference type.

share|improve this answer
    
-1...global variable? There is no such concept in .NET, and what would its purpose be here? –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '09 at 13:54
    
you're right, I mispoke. –  Kevin Oct 9 '09 at 13:56
    
Gotcha. Downvote removed! –  Adam Robinson Oct 9 '09 at 13:57

Initial value of propString is null. We cann't execute method of null. If you initialaze propString: propString = "" then you can execute GetType() without Exception

Code without exception:

private int      PropInt    { get; set; }
private DateTime PropDate   { get; set; }
private string   propString { get; set; }

propString = ""; // propString != null

WriteLine(PropInt.GetType().ToString());    // Result : System.Int32
WriteLine(PropDate.GetType().ToString());   // Result : System.DateTime
WriteLine(propString.GetType().ToString()); // Result : System.String
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.