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I have a loop on an array of nodes, and I am trying to show the name of each node as a tooltip for some Raphael elements on the screen.

Here is my code:

for(var i=0; i<nodes.length; i++){
       paper.rect(nodes[i].getX(), nodes[i].getY(), nodes[i].width, nodes[i].getHeight())
            .attr({fill:nodes[i].getColor(), "fill-opacity": 1}).mouseover(function () {
                    this.animate({"fill-opacity": .4}, 500);
                    this.attr({title:nodes[i].name});
            }).mouseout(function () {
                this.animate({"fill-opacity": 1}, 500);
            }).drag(move, dragstart, dragend);
    }

However, the nodes[i] in the .mouseover function is undefined.(why?!) can I pass it somehow like .mouseover(nodes[i]) to the function? then how can I use it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your mouseover function is called after the loop is completed, therefore i does no longer exist. A simple and flexible solution is to take advantage of Raphael's data() method to store the stuff you need:

paper.rect(nodes[i].getX(), nodes[i].getY(), nodes[i].width, nodes[i].getHeight())
    .attr({fill:nodes[i].getColor(), "fill-opacity": 1})
    .data({"title": nodes[i].name})
    .mouseover(function () {
          this.animate({"fill-opacity": .4}, 500);
          this.attr({title: this.data("title") });
    }).mouseout(function () {
          ...

You can change this to your liking, of course:

.data({"index": i})
...
this.attr({title: nodes[this.data("index")].name });

Or if you'll need more than one property, just store the whole object itself

.data({"node": nodes[i]})
...
this.attr({title: this.data("node").name });

It all comes down to whatever suits your purpose best.

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The scope changes in event handlers. Try declaring and defining the nodes and the mouseover/out functions outside the for-loop. Then use the function name for the mouse events: .mouseover(myFunctionDefinedOutsideForloop);

var myFunctionDefinedOutsideForloop = function(){
    this.animate({"fill-opacity": .4}, 500);
    this.attr({title:nodes[i].name});
}
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Here's a javascript trick to pass additional things to event handlers/callbacks through closures:

paper.rect(nodes[i].getX(), nodes[i].getY(), nodes[i].width, nodes[i].getHeight())
    .attr({fill:nodes[i].getColor(), "fill-opacity": 1})
    .data({"title": nodes[i].name})
    .mouseover(handleMouseOver(dataYouWant))
    .mouseout(function () {
    ...

function handleMouseOver(dataYouWant) {
    return function(){
      // use dataYouWant in your code
      this.animate({"fill-opacity": .4}, 500);
      this.attr({title: this.data("title") });
    }
}
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