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My problem is that I want to give a object back from child view (controller) to a parent view (controller). I pass the object with a call like this:

parentView.someObject=objectFromChild;

Everything is okay until the child view gets deleted (because it is poped up and no pointer shows on it) but then the object passed from child view to parent view gets also deleted. Can anyone tell me how to make it possible to save my object(even if the view which created it, is deleted)? With NSString my method works very well...but with objects I always get EXC_BAD_ACCESS

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Instead of building objectFromChild and setting someObject equal to it in parentView. Why not build the object using a method in parentView, then just access the object in parentView from the child when necessary by using the parentView.someObject dot notation. –  Kyle Mar 15 '13 at 19:15
    
I tried it but as soon as the childview is deleted the data in the object (lets say some strings) that were created by the child are not accessible anymore :-( –  user2173784 Mar 16 '13 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

Make sure the parent object is retaining it.

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Sounds like there are a couple of challenges here and I'll try to give some simple tips.

Passing Data
If you want to pass an object upward from a child to a parent, design your Child class so that the object or variable is a public property. Then, any other object (like Parent objects that own the Child) can access that property.

Keeping Data Alive
Usually EXC_BAD_ACCESS means the object has already been deleted by the system. Tell the system you want to hang on to the object by setting 'strong' in the property declaration, and this will take care of your EXC_BAD_ACCESS problem.

Take a look at the following code for an example of how to implement a very simple parent/child data relationship and retain data.

//****** Child.h

@interface Child : NSObject

// Child has a public property
// the 'strong' type qualifier will ensure it gets retained always
// It's public by default if you declare it in .h like so:
@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString *childString;

@end


//****** ParentViewController.h
#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "Child.h"

@interface ParentViewController : UIViewController

@property (strong, nonatomic) Child *myChild;

@end



//****** ParentViewController.m

@implementation ParentViewController

@synthesize myChild;

- (void)viewDidLoad {

    [super viewDidLoad];

    // create child object
    self.myChild = [[Child alloc] init];

    // set child object (from parent in this example)
    // You might do your owh setting in Child's init method
    self.myChild.childString = @"Hello";

    // you can access your childs public property
    NSLog(@"Child string = %@", self.myChild.childString;
}
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Thanks but I already mentioned that with NSString it is no problem. In your solution you have a pointer to the childview. So the childview is not deleted in your solution and you can access the var. –  user2173784 Mar 16 '13 at 7:54
    
@user2173784 Please post the code that declares/inits your Child's object. Plus everything that happens to the object up to the point were the Parent tries to access it. With more code people will have better context to help you. –  Eric Mar 16 '13 at 13:15

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