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I'm building a tree, and I have a class Node, that contains two or three integers, a vector, and a pointer. The vector stores Node instances, as follows -- naming Node as A:

class A {
public:
    A(A *parent) :
    _parent(parent) {
    }
    std::vector<INSTANCES_OF_A> v;
private:
    A *_parent;
};

I do may use:

class A {
public:
    A(A *parent) :
    _parent(parent) {
    }
    std::vector<A *> v;
private:
    A *_parent;
};

// Insertion
A a;
a.v.push_back(new A(&a));

Or:

class A {
public:
    A(A *parent) :
    _parent(parent) {
    }
    std::vector<A> v;
private:
    A *_parent;
};

// Insertion
A a(NULL);
a.v.push_back(A(&a));

In the first case, apart from the instance itself, I'd be allocating extra 4~8 bytes to each pointer to A.

In the second case, these 4~8 bytes would be saved, but the following scenario configures:

  • a.v.push_back(A(&a)) pushes back -- dynamically allocating, I suppose -- the instance built from A(&a);
  • the vector will push back these elements, but once it reaches a temporary limit, the vector will be reallocated, and it may be moved;
  • moving the vector changes the association of addresses built during the construction of each instance of A -- the A *_parent member.

Restraints:

  • I do not know the exact size of the initial vector;
  • reprocessing/rebuilding the links each time a vector reallocation occurs is bound to be too much extra processing.

Question:

Is there any way around this dangling pointer problem, respecting these two restraints? Or, is there any better approach to this problem?

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Every instance of A holds its own vector of instances to A. Is that what you want? –  Drew Dormann Mar 15 '13 at 20:21
    
@DrewDormann Yes, it is; I'm really sorry if I didn't make it clear in the above class definitions. –  Rubens Mar 15 '13 at 20:22
    
Your second example would not save you 4-8 bytes, as each copy of A would be bigger than a pointer. So your first case works, and uses less memory. Are you running into memory issues? –  Drew Dormann Mar 15 '13 at 22:01
    
@DrewDormann A is bigger than a pointer, but is also the only thing allocated in the second example; the first one allocates both A and the pointer. –  Rubens Mar 16 '13 at 0:54

2 Answers 2

Note that push_back makes a copy of an object, so the address of the object you push_back'ed to the vector would be meaningless to the vector. And yes, the vector class does reallocate memory if it has too little memory for storage. A classic approach to trees is to store pointers. You might find possible to implement your own kind of vector so that you reallocate it manually and thus are able to change all children' parents accordingly.

The std::vector stores pointers to data as well, otherwise you'd not be allowed to include vector<A> in A. So you have these 'dangling' pointers (which aren't dangling, more 'redundant' to me) anyway.

Please also note that moving actual data in-memory might be time-consuming and also increases memory fragmentation (if you care about redundant pointers, it must be important to you).

If you are programming for non-embedded systems where memory is not extremely limited, I advise to use the first approach, with explicit pointers. Otherwise you will loose time. The normal time vs memory.

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We don't know what you plan to do with your A objects, and if they are relatively big or not. For example, if they can be linked together (by presence in the v vector of another A) the second choice is a bad idea. It is also a bad idea if your A class contains several members, moreover if they are quite hungry in memory. As you pointed out, this could lead to vector resizings moving a lot of data. On top of that, your information could be redundant by having different instances of A with absolutely equal members.

I would go for the first approach by storing pointers or references to your A instances but you have to be careful about the scope. For example, do not add your pointers like follow :

void inSomeFunc(A& a)
{
    A b(NULL); // consider using nullptr if you can compile in C++11
    a.v.push_back(&b); // pushing the memory address of local variable 'b'
} // b goes out of scope, so the &b in a.v becomes invalid

In this case, if your try to access the element added in v you would probably end up with a runtime error.

Maybe give more precise information on your goal for a more specific answer.

Edit with additional information :

The usual way to build trees (especially with n children) is by storing pointers to child nodes. Maybe you could store the nodes directly instead of pointers if you had a static tree (build once and never modified after : read only). And still, it would end up with with a lot of work for the vector resizing if you have a high number of children.

Having a constant tree is not so useful apart from specific cases, so definitely the good way to go is by storing pointers to your nodes. This makes modifications on your tree much faster (you only have to manage adding and deleting pointers from your vector) and about as simple as managing the objects. The only thing you have to care about is memory handling. Your nodes will have to be allocated on the heap and deallocated by the destructor or declared as local variables somewhere you are sure they won't go out of scope (not recommanded).

I would do something like this :

class A {
public:
    A(A *parent) :
    _parent(parent) {}

    /* This will recursively free all the nodes in your tree but BEWARE :
       it would probably not work if you have loops in your tree          */
    ~A()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
            if(v[i] != NULL)
                delete v[i];
    }

    void addChild(A *node)
    {
        v.push_back(node);
    }

    A* addNewChild()
    {
        A* a = new A(this);
        addChild(a);
        return a;
    }

    // others accessors you need, for example operator[]

private:
    A *_parent;
    std::vector<A *> v;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I'm quite sure A b(NULL) will be destructed after inSomeFunc() call. Storing a pointer to it is incorrect, right? To add context, this is a simple tree, each A is a node, that stores nodes. –  Rubens Mar 15 '13 at 20:16
    
That's exactly why I am telling not to do this :p –  teh internets is made of catz Mar 15 '13 at 20:52
    
lol but I didn't say I'm doing it, I'm looking for some solution in performance -- the above approaches work fine, both of them. –  Rubens Mar 15 '13 at 21:08
2  
I'm giving you a piece of advice on what choice would be the better in my opinion, the incorrect example is there just to warn about an easy mistake, please read my answer carefully –  teh internets is made of catz Mar 15 '13 at 21:14
    
Sorry, didn't notice that; yet, I didn't get the answer I'm looking for. I'm adding a bit more of information on the class, with the proper context. –  Rubens Mar 16 '13 at 0:56

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