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I'm trying to figure out if my comment in the loop is correct. Will the variable 'device' be a "list of lists" like I'm hoping? If so, can I call the data by using device[0][0]? Or, say I want the third line and second item, use device[2][1]?

def deviceFile():
    devFile = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
    open(devFile, 'r')
    device = []
    for line in devFile:
        # creating an array here to hold each line. Call with object[0][0]
        device.append(line.split(','))
    return(device)

Edit:

def deviceFile():
'''This def will be used to retrieve a list of devices that will have
commands sent to it via sendCommands(). The user will need to supply
the full file path to the raw_input(). This file will need to be a csv,
will need to have column0 be the IP address, and column1 be the 
hostname(for file naming purposes). If a hostname is not supplied in
column1, the file will be named with the IP address.'''

devFile = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
thisFile = open(devFile, 'r')
device = []

for line in thisFile:
    # creating an array here to hold each line. Call with object[0][0]
    device.append(line.split(','))
thisFile.close()
return(device)

This is more of a 'am I doing this logically' more than 'is my code perfect' type of question. I want each line of the csv to be it's own list and be able to access it by calling it in my main program:

devices = deviceFile()

machine = devices[0][0]

returns the first item on the first line

machine = devices[2][1]

returns the second item on the third line

share|improve this question
    
By call, do you mean access? You call a function, not strings. I'm also not sure what your question is, have you tried doing what you are asking? –  Lattyware Mar 15 '13 at 20:03
2  
Seems fine, why don't you try it out? After you do, read up on csv module. –  Pavel Anossov Mar 15 '13 at 20:04
3  
@PavelAnossov It's definitely not fine - open() returns a file handle, it doesn't magically make the filename into one. It does, however, baffle me why the OP clearly hasn't tried running this code (or if they have, haven't made mention of the error). –  Lattyware Mar 15 '13 at 20:04
    
Most likely that's what I mean. I want to use the data in that location, right? –  user2175383 Mar 15 '13 at 20:05
1  
Oops, missed it. Yep, @user2175383, you should assign the result ot open to something and loop over that. –  Pavel Anossov Mar 15 '13 at 20:06
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2 Answers

Your problem is that you're not doing anything with the file object (the thing that open returns), but instead trying to operate on the filename as if it were a file object. So, just change this:

devFile = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
open(devPath, 'r')

to this:

devPath = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
devFile = open(devPath, 'r')

Once you do that, it "works", but maybe not in the way you intended. For example, for this file:

abc, def
ghi, jkl

You'll get back this:

[['abc', ' def\n'], ['ghi', ' jkl\n']]

The '\n' characters are there because for line in devFile: returns lines with the newline characters preserved. If you want to get rid of them, you have to do something, such as rstrip('\n').

The spaces are there because split doesn't do anything magical with spaces. You ask it to split 'abc, def' on ',' and you're going to get 'abc' and ' def' back. If you want to get rid of them, strip the result.

You've got various other minor problems—e.g., you never close the file—but none of them will actually stop your code from working.

So:

def deviceFile():
    devPath = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
    devFile = open(devPath, 'r')
    device = []
    for line in devFile:
        # creating an array here to hold each line. Call with object[0][0]
        device.append([value.strip() for value in line.rstrip('\n').split(',')])
    return(device)

Now you'll return this:

[['abc', 'def'], ['ghi', 'jkl']]

That device.append([value.strip() for value in line.rstrip('\n').split(',')]) looks pretty complicated. Calling rstrip on each line before you can split it is no big deal, but that list comprehension to call strip on each value makes it a bit hard to read. And if you don't know what list comprehensions are (which seems likely, given that you've got that explicit loop around append for the device list), you have to do something like this:

device = []
for line in devFile:
    values = []
    for value in line.rstrip('\n').split(','):
        values.append(value.strip())
    device.append(values)

However, there's a much easier way to do this. The csv module in the standard library takes care of all that tricky stuff with the newlines and whitespace, as well as things you haven't even thought of yet (like quoted or escaped values).

def deviceFile():
    devPath = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
    with open(devPath) as devFile:
        return list(csv.reader(devFile))
share|improve this answer
    
nice, I'll look into that csv module... seems much easier than stripping it myself... –  user2175383 Mar 15 '13 at 20:58
    
@user2175383: That's exactly why Python comes with "batteries included". There's a lot of stuff that isn't exactly hard, but is pretty tedious, and filled with pitfalls you don't think about in advance, and so on. So, rather than everyone reinventing the wheel, they just give you a pre-built wheel. (Which is, somehow, a battery? OK, sorry, I'm mixing metaphors…) –  abarnert Mar 15 '13 at 21:01
add comment

Correct me if I'm wrong, I think you're trying to read a file and then store each line in the file (separated by a comma) into an array. For example, if you have a text file that simply says "one, two, three" do you want this to create an array ['one', 'two', 'three']? If so, you don't need a for loop, simply do this:

def deviceFile():
    devFile = raw_input('Enter the full file path to your device list file: \n-->')
    myFile = open(devFile, 'r') # Open file in read mode
    readFile = myFile.read() # Read the file

    # Replace enter characters with commas
    readFile = readFile.replace('\n', ',')
    # Split the file by commas, return an array
    return readFile.split(',')

The reason you don't need a for loop is because str.split() already returns an array. In fact, you don't even need to append "device", you don't need device at all. See the string documentation for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
awesome, so my deplorable file handling aside, my iteration seems legit? –  user2175383 Mar 15 '13 at 20:15
    
Actually, wait no, I just tested this. See my edit. –  Murkantilism Mar 15 '13 at 20:23
    
Edited one more time, realized you don't need device = [] or a for loop. –  Murkantilism Mar 15 '13 at 20:31
    
list of lists.. guess none of you read anything but the code. Alright, guess this isn't the place to ask for help in logic or theory. Sorry to have troubled you guys... csv: x,y\n a,b\n lol,wtf\n device would store all that information: device = [[x,y],[a,b],[lol,wtf]] access it by: device[0][0] x device[2][1] wtf –  user2175383 Mar 15 '13 at 20:33
    
Neither version is right. The first iterates over all characters in the file. The second splits the entire file on commas, so "one,two\nthree,four\n" will split into ["one", "two\nthree", "four\n"]. You probably want to loop over for line in myFile:. –  abarnert Mar 15 '13 at 20:41
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