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I'm learning C++ and I created two simple hello-world applications. In both of them I use operator overload, but here is the problem. On the first one, I can provide two arguments to overload operator, and it's fine.

Header:

enum Element {a,b,c,d,e};
Element operator + (Element x, Element y);
//more overloads for -, *, / here

Source:

Element operator + (Element x, Element y) {
    return ArrayOfElements[x][y];
}

But in my second app (simple complex number calculator) - this method didn't work. After googling and figuring out why, I end up with this code:

Header:

struct Complex {
        double Re;
        double Im;

        Complex (double R, double I) : Re(R), Im(I) { }

        Complex operator + (Complex &Number);
        //more overloads
    };

Source:

Complex Complex::operator + (Complex &Number)
    {
        Complex tmp = Complex(0, 0);
        tmp.Re = Re + Number.Re;
        tmp.Im = Im + Number.Im;
        return tmp;
    }

It's working now, but I want to know, why in the first piece of code I was allowed to put two arguments in operator overloading, but with the second one I was given the following error?

complex.cpp:5:51: error: 'Complex Complex::operator+(Complex, Complex)' must take either zero or one argument

It's the same whenever I use classes or not. I've been seeking through many docs and the second way seem to be more correct. Maybe it's because of different argument types?

Both sources compiled with -Wall -pedantic parameters using g++, both are using the same libraries.

share|improve this question
4  
Member functions have an implicit this argument – David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 15 '13 at 20:43
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Suppose you have a class like this:

class Element {
public:
    Element(int value) : value(value) {}
    int getValue() const { return value; }
private:
    int value;
};

There are four ways to define a binary operator such as +.

  1. As a free function with access to only the public members of the class:

    // Left operand is 'a'; right is 'b'.
    Element operator+(const Element& a, const Element& b) {
        return Element(a.getValue() + b.getValue());
    }
    

    e1 + e2 == operator+(e1, e2)

  2. As a member function, with access to all members of the class:

    class Element {
    public:
        // Left operand is 'this'; right is 'other'.
        Element operator+(const Element& other) const {
            return Element(value + other.value);
        }
        // ...
    };
    

    e1 + e2 == e1.operator+(e2)

  3. As a friend function, with access to all members of the class:

    class Element {
    public:
        // Left operand is 'a'; right is 'b'.
        friend Element operator+(const Element& a, const Element& b) {
            return a.value + b.value;
        }
        // ...
    };
    

    e1 + e2 == operator+(e1, e2)

  4. As a friend function defined outside the class body—identical in behaviour to #3:

    class Element {
    public:
        friend Element operator+(const Element&, const Element&);
        // ...
    };
    
    Element operator+(const Element& a, const Element& b) {
        return a.value + b.value;
    }
    

    e1 + e2 == operator+(e1, e2)

share|improve this answer
2  
If it's a member function, you can do Element(2) + 3 but not 2 + Element(3). – aschepler Mar 15 '13 at 20:49
    
I don't have any classes in the first one (just in the second one), but thanks for the great answer! – Lemurr Mar 15 '13 at 21:59

Since + is a binary operator, if you overload it inside a struct/class, you can only provide one more operand, the reason is that the first operand is implicitly the calling object. That is why in the first case, you have two parameters since it is outside scope of your class/struct, while in the second case, it was overloaded as member function.

share|improve this answer

If you prefer that operator+ takes both operands as explicit arguments, it must be defined as a free (i.e. non-member) function:

class Complex {
    friend Complex operator+(const Complex& lhs, const Complex& rhs);
}

Complex operator+(const Complex& lhs, const Complex& rhs) {
    ...
}

You have to use this form if the left operand is of a primitive type, or of a class that you don't control (and thus can't add a member function to).

share|improve this answer
2  
... and you should use this form if there might be any implicit conversions to Complex. – aschepler Mar 15 '13 at 20:48

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