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Is it possible to have a collection of generically typed Items, given the following code:

public abstract class AGeneric<T> {
internal virtual List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}


public class LibA<T> : AGeneric<T> {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}

public class LibB<T> : AGeneric<T> {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}

public class LibC<T> : AGeneric<T> {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}
//.
//.
//.
Main {
    List<AGeneric>  test  = new List<AGeneric>(); //error - requires type; 
    List<BGeneric>  test2 = new List<BGeneric>();
    test2.first().


}

public abstract class BGeneric {
internal virtual List<T>  MyList { get; set; } //cant use T to provide implementation       
}


public class LibD<T> : BGeneric {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}

public class LibE<T> : BGeneric {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}

public class LibF<T> :BGeneric {
internal override List<T>  MyList { get; set; } 
}

The goal is to have a List of various types be implemented from an abstract class since the purpose of the classes is to determine , and return an array of strongly typed objects.

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3  
AGeneric isn't a type; a generic type does not actually define a type until you give it a type argument. Did you mean to say that LibA<T> extends AGeneric<T> ? –  Eric Lippert Mar 15 '13 at 20:51
    
Wouldn't it be simpler to create an interface that everything you wanted to stick in the list could implement? –  Kenneth K. Mar 15 '13 at 20:51
    
@EricLippert, LibA<T> does extend AGeneric<T> based on class definition now, I've fixed the code. –  sammarcow Mar 15 '13 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

Nope, however you can make a list of a non-generics with runtime type. This example is basically what you're after however it will generate a runtime error (only example 1) because AGeneric requires a Generic Parameter. If you can restructure what you have to not be a generic then you can adapt this work:

Type listType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(AGeneric<>));
var answer = Activator.CreateInstance(listType);

In the same fashion, if you must have AGeneric you can make the list with it's runtime type

int myRunTimeVariable = 0;
Type MyType = myRunTimeVariable.GetType();

Type listType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(AGeneric<>).MakeGenericType(MyType));
var answer = Activator.CreateInstance(listType);

answer will be of type List<AGeneric<int>> in this case. But it's still not a List<AGeneric<>>

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