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I have a numpy array of the following form:

['viola.jpg' '0.81' '1.0693461723' '100']
['viola.jpg' '0.44' '1.31469086921' '18']
['viola.jpg' '0.8' '3.92096084523' '73']
['vlasta.jpg' '0.88' '1.36559123399' '110']
['vlasta.jpg' '0.88' '1.88126493001' '45']
['vlasta.jpg' '0.76' '1.0510328514' '88']

I want to average for every new identifier in column 0 the values in column 1 and 2. From the above I would like to get something like:

['viola.jpg' '0.68' '2.14354']
['vlasta.jpg' '0.84' '1.41324']

(the last column is completely irrelevant here, it can be a mean of the numbers, a random one of them, or completely left out)

I have tried to do this - but it fails because reduceat doesn't like flexible types (my array of the above form being "pics")

pics = pics[pics[:,0].argsort()]
print pics
last = pics[:,0]
w = np.where(last[:-1] != last[1:])[0] + 1
w = np.concatenate(([0], w, [len(pics)])) #add 0 and last value
print type(pics), type(w)
means = np.add.reduceat(pics, w[:-1])/np.diff(w)[:,None]
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by bernie, Jon Clements, Rik Poggi, Inbar Rose, Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 17 '13 at 15:37

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Are those lists? And are those actual strings instead of numbers? Also, what have you tried so far? –  Rik Poggi Mar 15 '13 at 22:11
2  
values may not be correct in my example? It'd be nice if indeed you did know what values to expect. Also - what attempts have you made at researching solutions to this - what specifically are you stuck on etc...? –  Jon Clements Mar 15 '13 at 22:14
1  
ye olde itertools.groupby and probably a nested list comprehension will get you far –  Mr E Mar 15 '13 at 22:16
1  
If you use a dictionary, it would be MUCH easier. –  F3AR3DLEGEND Mar 15 '13 at 22:20
2  
Well - to try and improve this question before it's closed - you need to answer 1) Do you have a list of lists - at the moment, you have several separate lists of a single string (you're missing the , delimiter) - 2) Instead of calculating it in your head - verify your expected output with your input (use a calculator - you do have a computer with a calculator tool even if you don't have a calculator on your desk right?) 3) Show any attempt you've made so far, or at least resources you've found that you don't fully understand –  Jon Clements Mar 15 '13 at 22:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have no idea where you got this list of strings from, but if it is from a file, use genfromtxt to get a nice numpy array from it, with the correct types:

import numpy as np
from StringIO import StringIO   # to create example file
s = """ viola.jpg  0.81 1.0693461723  100
        viola.jpg  0.44 1.31469086921  18
        viola.jpg  0.8  3.92096084523  73
        vlasta.jpg 0.88 1.36559123399 110
        vlasta.jpg 0.88 1.88126493001  45
        vlasta.jpg 0.76 1.0510328514   88"""
f = StringIO(s) # creates example file with content above
a = np.genfromtxt(f, names = "image, someval, another, someid", dtype=['S12', float, float, int])

Now, a is a structured array. You can access the columns using the field name:

images = np.uniques(a['image']) # gets unique values of the column named 'image'
b = np.empty(len(images), dtype = a.dtype)
for i, image in enumerate(images):
    m = a['image'] == image
    b[i] = (image,) + tuple(a[m][n].mean() for n in a.dtype.names[1:])

:( Maybe it's not that much better... sorry for the exaggeration. However, it's worth it to introduce you to structured arrays. Now, to look at b:

In [3]: b
Out[3]: 
array([('viola.jpg', 0.6833333333333332, 2.101665962246667, 63),
       ('vlasta.jpg', 0.84, 1.4326296718, 81)], 
      dtype=[('image', '|S12'), ('someval', '<f8'), ('another', '<f8'), ('someid', '<i8')])

In [4]: b['image']
Out[4]: 
array(['viola.jpg', 'vlasta.jpg'], 
      dtype='|S12')

In [5]: b['someval']
Out[5]: array([ 0.68333333,  0.84      ])

In [6]: b[1]
Out[6]: ('vlasta.jpg', 0.84, 1.4326296718, 81)

In [7]: b[b['image']=='viola.jpg']
Out[7]: 
array([('viola.jpg', 0.6833333333333332, 2.101665962246667, 63)], 
      dtype=[('image', '|S12'), ('someval', '<f8'), ('another', '<f8'), ('someid', '<i8')])

Given what you are starting with in the question, you can do something like this:

a = np.array([['viola.jpg', '0.81', '1.0693461723', '100'],
              ['viola.jpg', '0.44', '1.3146908692', '18'],
              ['viola.jpg', '0.8', '3.9209608452', '73'],
              ['vlasta.jpg', '0.88', '1.3655912339', '110'],
              ['vlasta.jpg', '0.88', '1.8812649300', '45'],
              ['vlasta.jpg', '0.76', '1.0510328514', '88']])

uniques = np.uniques(a[:,0])
b = np.empty((len(uniques), len(a[0])), dtype = 'S12')

for i,s in enumerate(uniques):
    m = a[:,0] == s
    b[i] = [s] + [a[m,j].astype(float).mean() for j in [1,2]] + [int(a[m,3].astype(float).mean())]
print b
#[['viola.jpg' '0.6833333333' '2.1016659622' '64']
# ['vlasta.jpg' '0.84' '1.4326296717' '81']]

If you use a better data structure it's MUCH easier to keep track of what's a float, int, and string. For proof, see @HYRY's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by a batter data structure? –  TheChymera Mar 15 '13 at 22:57
    
I'll edit to show a structured array –  askewchan Mar 15 '13 at 23:00
1  
I read my file with paste2.org/p/3169593 and genfromtxt won't work because AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'split' :( –  TheChymera Mar 15 '13 at 23:51
1  
@askewchan You can numpify your answer quite a bit: uniques, _ = np.unique(a[:, 0], return_inverse=True); counts = np.bincount(_); mean_1 = np.bincount(_, weights=a[:, 1]) / counts; mean_2 = np.bincount(_, weights=a[:, 2]) / counts. –  Jaime Mar 16 '13 at 0:16
    
@TheChymera What list were you trying to split with genfromtxt? You can give it a delimiter kwarg as well: a = np.genfromtxt(dataFile, delimiter = ',', names=..., dtype=...) –  askewchan Mar 16 '13 at 1:41

You can use pandas to do this quickly:

import pandas as pd

data=[['viola.jpg', '0.81', '1.0693461723', '100'],
['viola.jpg', '0.44', '1.31469086921', '18'],
['viola.jpg', '0.8', '3.92096084523', '73'],
['vlasta.jpg', '0.88', '1.36559123399', '110'],
['vlasta.jpg', '0.88', '1.88126493001', '45'],
['vlasta.jpg', '0.76', '1.0510328514', '88']]

df = pd.DataFrame(data, dtype=float)
print df.groupby(0).mean()

Result:

                   1         2          3
0                                        
viola.jpg   0.683333  2.101666  63.666667
vlasta.jpg  0.840000  1.432630  81.000000
share|improve this answer
    
OP might want strings of floats and ints as the example output shows... not sure. –  askewchan Mar 15 '13 at 22:48
    
no, I don't want strings specifically. pandas sounds wonderful, but I would not require the entire module just for this one function. Many thanks, though. –  TheChymera Mar 15 '13 at 22:59

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