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Consider the following program : LWS

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

void test()
{
   static const std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point marker 
   = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
   std::cout<<marker.time_since_epoch().count()<<std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    std::cout<<std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()
    .time_since_epoch().count()<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<"--------"<<std::endl;
    test();
    std::cout<<"--------"<<std::endl;
    test();
    return 0;
}

With g++, the result is :

1363389335665993
--------
1363389335666701
--------
1363389335666701

Which means that marker, the static constant inside the test() function is evaluated during the first call of this function. Is there a way or a trick (except by declaring marker as a global variable) to force evaluation of marker at the beginning of the program ?

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1  
Why not call the function at the beginning? You could pass a flag so the function doesn't do anything else. –  QuentinUK Mar 15 '13 at 23:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. A static in a function is evaluated the first time the function is called. If you need it to be evaluated sooner, it must be made a global. One alternative is to simply call the function at the beginning of the program, to for the static to be evaluated, before you actually need the function.

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He could use the function to initialize an unused global, forcing it to be called before main. –  Mooing Duck Mar 16 '13 at 0:02
    
@MooingDuck: That doesn't seem much different than just using a global to begin with. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 16 '13 at 0:35

You could fake the function with a class like so:

struct test_
{
    const std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point marker; 

    test_()
      : marker( std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now() )
    {}

    void operator()() const
    {
      std::cout<<marker.time_since_epoch().count()<<std::endl;
    }
} test;

although this is probably too much of a hack to be usable in practice.

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